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How to build a Victor VTS253a-1993

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by Matt F., Oct 7, 2010.

  1. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Build 2~ vts253a-1993 (medical/lab grade)

    The first thing to do, not unlike the vts253b-320 is remove the OEM hose adapter. To do this I use air tools. I don't have a vice, which would be necessary if you use hand tools.

    To remove the OEM hose adapter, I used a 9/16" deep impact socket (impact gun), which got me to this point:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here is a pic of all the parts (except my chrome plated JBJ bubble counter, which I forgot to get out):
    [​IMG]

    A few things I noticed doing this build:

    1) The swagelok stainless steel parts are MUCH better quality than the brass.

    2) I can torque th eheck out of the stainless bushings much more than the brass (without worry). The pieces fit together much tighter it seems.

    3) The 1993's working adjustment knob seems a bit less accurate and definitely less smooth than the delrin bushing in the vts253b-320. The perceived inaccuracy is maybe due to the fact that the working pressure psi gauge only goes up to 30psi (you can see more movement).
     
    #1 Matt F., Oct 7, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2011
  2. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    The next step is to install the 1/4" mpt x 1/8" mpt nipple adapter.
    Again I use ARP's non hardening thread sealer
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Roasted green tea break:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Just a note about tool usage: The only tool you need is a smaller sized crescent wrench.

    Learning from my first go-around with the vts253b-320, I installed the 1/8"fpt x 1/8" mpt 90* elbow in the solenoid first, although the vts253a-1993 seems to have more room than the vts253b-320. I tigheted that down before connecting it to the adapter nipple (1/4"mpt x 1/8" mpt nipple).
    [​IMG]

    PLEASE NOTE: The direction of gas flow shown in the picture below is incorrect (it is backwards). See here for correct configuration: http://www.barrreport.com/showthread.php/7864-Burkert-Solenoids-gas-flow-direction-is-important-in-preventing-leaks

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then attach the first 1/8" mpt hex nipple
    [​IMG]
     
    #3 Matt F., Oct 7, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2010
  4. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Then comes the Ideal Valve
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then the second 1/8" hex nipple
    [​IMG]

    Then the chrome plated JBJ bubble counter, which I had done at Chromemasters
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A little side by side comparison between the two prior to testing for leaks
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    It should be noted that whenever you use non-hardening thread sealer, you are always going to have excess.

    I use q-tips and a toothbrush to clean off as much as possible after assembly. The toothbrush gets inbetween the threads. Just make sure you don't use the toothbrush later on that night...

    I use windex or simple green to pressure check my regulators
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Tomorrow I will show you how to tune an Ideal Valve's micrometer to represent how many bubble per second. I set mine to 4 bps and it's steady.
     
  6. Gilles

    Gilles Lifetime Members
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    I really like this guys, what are the costs on the parts used? And can you guys maybe ship one to an US address for me?
     
  7. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Gilles-

    It's really hard to quote a price for a dual stage regulator. A lot of the time, we buy them for a rediculously cheap price (used). I got this brand new vts253a-1993 for $62. They retail new for $235. The post body parts are pieced together. See Left C's thread for the appropriate part numbers. The JBJ bubble counter I got chromed at Chromemasters (again from the link Left C posted).

    The rest of the post body is made by swagelok (part numbers are in Left C's thread). The needle valve is an Ideal Metering Valve in stainless.

    I bought the brass Burkert solenoid from aquariumplant.com
     
  8. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Here is my most recent build (the one I'm running on my tank). It's and all stainless/chromed post body:

    [​IMG]

    (Again, this is the incorrect gas flow direction)
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #8 Matt F., Oct 28, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2011
  9. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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  10. Left C

    Left C Lifetime Members

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    This is simple to fix. Unscrew the 1993's knob and spray WD40 onto the area that the knob rides on and onto the threads. It will fix it right up. Victor (mrmotorcycles) told me about this. It makes a huge difference in how smooth that it operated.
     
  11. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    I've actually used clear grease (specifically: SUperlube). It does work. ;)
     
  12. Left C

    Left C Lifetime Members

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    You'll think that something is wrong with the regulator, but all it needs is a touch of lube.
     
  13. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    those are slick looking regs. a very nice build.

    I have to say...every time I see one of these stainless steel builds, all shiny and chromed, I want one. There really are a lot of cool gadgets in this hobby.
     
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