This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.
  1. Support us by upgrading to the lifetime advertisement free version.

    Click here for more information.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
    Dismiss Notice

When to Replace Biological Filter Media??

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by DLoja, Apr 14, 2015.

  1. DLoja

    DLoja Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2
    Local Time:
    11:53 PM
    I've personally been using the EHEIM Subtrat Pro Biological Filter Media for at least 10 years now. I'm realizing that at some point I just stopped ever replacing it and just wash and reuse wash and reuse. I do have two filters going, both full of this filter media, so if the only reason to replace it is that it's efficiency goes down as the small nooks and crannies get clogged up, maybe it's not necessary if you have extra as I do? Does it break down? Does it clog up well beyond losing 50% or even 75% efficiency?


    I'm curious what others do and why.


    Thanks!


    David
     
  2. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    44
    Local Time:
    11:53 PM
    Hard media does not need to be replaced. The only maintenance is to remove excess biofilm and dirt to improve flow.
     
  3. DLoja

    DLoja Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2
    Local Time:
    11:53 PM
    I forgot to mention that the company states you should rinse the media every 1-3 months and replace it every 3-6 months. If I only had room for a small amount of media, i.e. less than or even equal to the recommended amount per gallon of tank water, then I would understand how it's effectiveness decreases and I'd want fresh media with its extremely high surface area. But since I have way more than recommended, I tend to think it not a big deal. On the other hand, it very well may be over 7 years old, or even over 10, I simply can't remember, and I'm not sure if I should care at some point. :)


    I should mention I've also never had any disease breakout since the tank was really young, over 9 or 10 years ago.


    Solcielo, do you mean just a simple rinse, or something further? I've always just ran mine under the faucet water. I know it's recommend to use tank water, and I understand why, but since I do it in stages without disturbing all the other beneficial bacteria in other areas, this has always worked well for me to get it nice and clean. Honestly, I'm not sure how people use tank water... Just grab a bucket full and pour it over top of the media baskets while in the sink?


    Thanks,


    David
     
  4. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    44
    Local Time:
    11:53 PM
    They want you to replace it because it's forces you to buy new ones (so they can make profit.) There is no need to replace filter media because they last almost forever. It's a one-time expense. (The sponge I'm using is more than 25 years old but works perfectly.)


    The only reason to rinse is if the film or debris has clogged the flow. If it hasn't, then there is no need to do so. If it's clogged, swish it around in water to loosen the debris. Tap water works and there shouldn't be paranoia about the chloramines killing all the microbes. It won't.
     
  5. Kristie Anderson

    Kristie Anderson Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2015
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:53 PM
    I found myself having to replace my ceramic media when i had hard water. The minerals would actually fill in all the media spaces. My water is from a well, and lets just say it was off any of the charts you can buy to test at home. Even when I had it tested by the local water department, all they would say was WOW, that is some HARD water. From what I was told on almost all fronts, is we have liquid rock. My plants would become calcified over a matter of a few weeks. We made some changes, and now I no longer have this issue. But if you have extremely hard water, you may just have to change the media more. :D
     
  6. DLoja

    DLoja Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2
    Local Time:
    11:53 PM
    My water is on the soft side, and I add some GH Boost to bring it to about 10-11. I guess you could see the mineral deposits on your media then huh? Mine just gets dirty and filled with fish waste. I don't have the best water pressure here, but a quick rinse from the faucet seems to get most of it off, though how clogged up the minute holes are, and how much lower that is bringing the usable surface area, I don't know. But my system seems to be doing fine with its abundance of old media, so I guess I won't replace it unless something happens or people say to do otherwise.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice