This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
    Dismiss Notice

what kinde of Algae

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by hani, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. hani

    hani Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
  2. hani

    hani Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    any thoughts
    thanks
     
  3. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Likes Received:
    88
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    It looks like black brush algae, BBA, which usually shows up if you don't have enough CO2 in the water, and high high light intensity. Not having enough CO2 can be a water circulation problem, where there is plenty at the drop checker location, but not in and among the plants. So improving circulation and increasing CO2 can help, once you get rid of what is already there. Also, how long are your lights on and what size tank with what lights?
     
  4. hani

    hani Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    its a 29g tank, CO2 max, the co2 is via glass diffuser on one side and ventri reactor on the other side, am using eheim 2217 filter, there are 3 power head extra, water movment is verey good.
    i have a 110watt light total for 8 hours
    dont know if i should cut down on lights?
    thanks
     
  5. hani

    hani Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    could it be Staghorn algae ?
    thanks
     
  6. eyebeatbadgers

    eyebeatbadgers Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2007
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    No, definitely BBA. You can kill what you have now with H2O2, or excel treatments. Steady Co2 will keep more from growing back.
     
  7. Panda

    Panda Guru Class Expert

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM

    Can you explain this H2O2 ( Hydrogen peroxide ) method? I have some BBA too in a driftwood. Should I take the driftwood out and clean it with H2O2 ?
     
  8. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Likes Received:
    88
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    I used to use 110 watts of light on a 29 gallon tank and found it was almost impossible to control algae. Assuming that light is two 55 watt bulbs, it is better to use two 36 watt bulbs, in my experience. If the light is a AH Supply light the ballast is the same which ever wattage you use. The 36 watt bulbs are just shorter.

    One way to kill BBA is to lift out the object or plant that has it, spray it with the whole tank dose of Excel and return it to the tank. Excel kills BBA pretty fast. But, the normal tank dosage can take a long time to kill any existing BBA.

    Last month Tom told me he was able to kill green spot algae on a rock by pulling the rock out, sprinkling the tanks dosage of KH2PO4 on the algae, waiting a bit and returning it to the tank. And, I think that works well for blue green algae too, if you sprinkle it with KNO3.

    Obviously if the tank has a lot of algae it would take a lot of days of dosing to hand treat every plant and piece of hardscape that way. So, it is best to just remove algae infested leaves, and limit the hand dosing to things like driftwood or rocks.
     
  9. hani

    hani Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    thanks vaughn, i did remove few leaves, but still , the tanks is 2 years old, no problems before with this algae, my SAE DIED about 1 month ago, am not sure if it was the true SAE.
    I read for few hours on the net, it looks like the battle is difficult to win.
    for now i will cut down on my kno3 to half, i will stop the po4. k will be the same.
    one more thing i am having problem with is my Aponogeton ulvaceus leaves turnning white , yes white not realy translucent, it is still growing and flouring like crazy, i thought may be ca am adding somm gh booster, any thoughts.
    thanks
     
  10. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Likes Received:
    88
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    Reducing your dosing of KNO3 and KH2PO4 will make the algae problem much worse. It is fast growing plants that discourage algae from starting, and that requires that they be adequately fertilized. Fertilizing is not a cause of algae problems unless it is from under fertilizing so the plants don't grow well. This is true for high light tanks like you have.

    Rather than playing with the fertililzing, you need to either reduce your light intensity or work at getting much better distribution and concentration of CO2 in the tank, plus good pruning and cleaning routines. The usual way to reduce light intensity is to use fewer bulbs or lower wattage bulbs. The other way is to raise the light fixture further, and that usually means suspending it above the tank on cables attached to the ceiling or to brackets attached to the wall or to the tank stand.

    It also helps a great deal to reduce the lights on period down to 8 hours a day or less.
     
  11. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Messages:
    678
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    11:56 PM
    A bleach dip helps kill algae on driftwood. Just rinse with lots of dechlor afterward. You can also bleach dip plants 1:20 bleach:water for 3 minutes. This will kill any bba. Once it's there, you have to first fix the conditions that are causing it (probably high lighting in your case), then kill it all manually to obliterate it. It will never die on it's own even if you fix the problem, it will just stop spreading.
     
Loading...

Share This Page