What is the "ideal" average temp for a macro tank?

derekparr

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Jan 23, 2005
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So.. What is the "ideal" average temp for a macro tank?
I seem to be reading that many macro's are pretty adaptable, but they "prefer" something cooler than normal? What exactly are the numbers we're talking about here? 80F? 70F? 65F?

Also, a little confused about what is considered a good average amount of lighting (in respect to fluorescents). Given that the general recommended average for a freshwater planted tank is around 2wpg, what is the general recommended average for a saltwater macroalgae and/or sea grass tank? (is there a difference?)

Thanks.
 

Tom Barr

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For tropical: 78-75F is good.

Cold water etc, depends.

Regards,
tom Barr
 

richardsantink

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Apr 3, 2005
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Tom Barr;23591 said:
For tropical: 78-75F is good.

Cold water etc, depends.

Regards,
tom Barr


For any of the coldwater types, you typically can't get it cold enough. I have found that Irish Moss does quite well in cool to warm temps (~65-70).

Not sure if it applies to the tropical types, but I find that the circulation is almost as important as the temperature for N. Atlantic species. An Ascophyllum nodosum (god rest its thalli..) I had, seemed to fare okay, so long as it received vigorous water circulation/agitation. However, once the temperature went above 60, it didn't last too long.

RAS
 

Tom Barr

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Most cold and Tropical macros respond by going to the land of Spores when you change the temp by much(2 C even).

That's why we find different species in the winter and the summer in cold and in tropical locations.

I've seen this pattern for 5-6 years now in CA and in FL over a wide range of locations.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

richardsantink

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Tom Barr;23622 said:
Most cold and Tropical macros respond by going to the land of Spores when you change the temp by much(2 C even).

That's why we find different species in the winter and the summer in cold and in tropical locations.

I've seen this pattern for 5-6 years now in CA and in FL over a wide range of locations.

Regards,
Tom Barr


So my transporting them from Maine to Ontario alone could trigger it (since it easily fluctuates by 15 degrees over 8hrs. Codium, Chaetomorpha, Enteromorpha, Chondrus and a few others didn't seem to mind the change too much, but Ascophyllum, Fucus, Laminaria, etc. seem to be a real challenge to keep for any length of time.

Tom, in your experience, is there a better/worse time of the year to harvest specimens? I usually drive to Maine in early September to grab my macros, but wonder if there's any advantage to collecting in say, spring?


RAS
 

derekparr

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Jan 23, 2005
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Land of "spores"?
I'll have to admit to lacking most knowledge of the life cycle of macroalgae. Apparently they all or most use spores? Kind of like ferns? What does this look like when it happens in a tank? Does the macroalgae just melt and die leaving "spores" drifting around in the water column? Can these spores then not grow into full sized macroalgae?
Feel free to point me to a better source for all these questions. Thanks.
 

Tom Barr

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Temps cause the algae to go from a macrophytic asexual state, to a sexual spore state in some species.

Typically they melt back and fritter away as they undergo this change.

Reds= winter.
Greens and weedy types= summer.

At least for FL and CA.

Some respond to upwelling, nutrients etc, some light times.
I think I did well with the reds since I use 10 hour light times, and do well with Caulperas at 12-15.

Some algae do not care about Light or Temp.
Some sporulate based on moon light.



Regards,
Tom Barr