What Causes Stem Rot?

scottward

Guru Class Expert
Oct 26, 2007
958
10
18
Brisbane, Australia
Sure it is still co2, it's always co2.

Yep. These fast growing stem plants are real fussy about CO2 stability. These plants generally grow fine in non-CO2 tanks (hence the "beginner" tag so often associated with them) because the CO2 level is stable (albeit stable at a low concentration).

Once you start injecting CO2, if it's not stable enough, these stems curl up their toes.

I think the whole system needs be to geared for stability, starting with a good dual-stage regulator, good stable needle valve etc etc.

I've pretty much given up on the fast growing stems for the moment as I just can't get things stable enough in my tank (and can't afford to purchase better quality gear just now; I am using an inexpensive single stage reg and eBay needle value).

Scott.
 

suhail_ssr

New Member
Mar 7, 2019
1
0
1
India
Has anyone found out the reason and solution?

I am also facing the same problem in my low tech non co2 tank. While the new leaves continue to look good the plants are rotting from stem upwards

Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
 

Barbara C. Lamb

New Member
Sep 13, 2019
3
0
1
32
USA
Frankly says I don't have more knowledge about stem rot, but I gathered few notes after viewing Fisharoma website where they told that the most common causes of stem rot are poor water quality and improper water temperature. As well as overcrowding the tank, feeding outdated food or overfeeding the fish can also cause the stem rot problem.
 

Patrick

New Member
Dec 15, 2019
2
0
1
25
Philippines
has anyone find out what causes this stem rot?
i replanted my ludwigia inclinata to my other tank but i notice it was not growing like before
i pull out the plant and i see that the roots and the stem where the roots grow started rotting
anyone? help please
 

Phishless

Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
Jul 13, 2017
1,103
972
113
Arnold, MD
There are some great answers already in this thread! :D

I've seen this question posted before and don't recall seeing any of the "big guns" reply.
1. The stem is damaged during the cutting/replanting stage e.g. use sharp scissors (no pinching) to cut the stems of larger diameter stem plants and dont crush the stem when you re-plant the top.

Plants are first damaged when cultivated for shipment.
LFS's handle them @ least twice before the third time when placed in a bag for your purchase.
Then it is up to you to unravel the bunch and determine what to trash from the bottoms.

I have heard that floating the plant and allowing it to develop roots on it's own, then planting it once there are roots there, will solve this problem.

Floating plants can work but who wants twisted and contorted stems that have been rolling around praying for light?

What I have observed is that if the conditions are such that stem plants will grow rapidly, there is no stem rot.
But, if anything is off so that they will not grow rapidly, you do get stem rot.
Like all generalizations, this one breaks down for certain plants for certain people.
Some stem plants refuse to grow for me no matter what I do. I solve that problem by growing other stem plants
Fortunately there are many, many to choose from.

Remember every plant is not for you.
Some don't like the soup you serve!

Here's the general idea behind what is referred to as "auto fragmentation".
Low nutrients, low CO2 particularly and low N, bad place to live.
Maybe current, maybe light etc, anyway, the plants break up in hopes of drifting away to a better place and regrowing,
sort of like seed dispersal, but much faster and better to find new and better habitat.

Generally poor CO2, poor nutrients(easy to rule out light and nutrients).
Tom Barr

Poor water quality in regards to growing plants. I didn't say phish.

I have noticed stem rot to occur on stems (mainly faster growers) because they get shaded near the bottom by new growth.
L.repens x 'cant remember the cross plant' is horrible and so is d.diandra too.

Some plants just do not like to be crowded.
This is also true of syngonanthis Madeira and tonina 'narrow leaf' in my tanks.
The stems have to be about one inch apart or after a week or so they will rot.

Shading & space requirements can play a factor too.

The only addition I would add is that I've seen high ammonia levels in a "hot" soil cause this issue.
One thing I've never seen is an instruction guide for people that are new to the hobby regarding "planting".
 

Tim Fehilly

New Member
Apr 29, 2020
6
1
3
48
Wappingers, New York
Hi all - I'm dealing with the same stem rot issue across my rotala rotundifolia. The issue really only started appearing after I received delivery of plants that suffered terribly from melt during transit. I tried salvaging what I could but in retrospect wonder did I introduce a fungus into the tank, and in using the same scissors to trim the plants did I unintentionally transfer it to new trimmings prior to planting.

I've been doing my best to contain the problem but may simply turn to the scorched earth approach.
 

Tim Fehilly

New Member
Apr 29, 2020
6
1
3
48
Wappingers, New York
Patient zero ?

s-l1600.jpg
 

Tim Fehilly

New Member
Apr 29, 2020
6
1
3
48
Wappingers, New York
The seller was great and did replace the plants - I made the mistake of not throwing them away and trying to salvage. No remedy for stem rot - it kept coming back on the Rotala.

IMG_20200719_141445.jpg