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Water circulation and CO2

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by VaughnH, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. Hector M Lomelin

    Hector M Lomelin Junior Poster

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    Much confused!!

    ok so i have this friend at work who had a 2 gallon aquarium set up for her betta, for some reason her betta died, her next betta died, and then so did some cherry shrimp i put in there. Needless to say she wasnt the most attentive aquarist there is. The aquarium had an anubis and some broad leaf light green ones from Petsmart that come in gel in her aquarium starting with when she set up her tank.
    the tank stayed in the office and was devoid of any light friday afternoon to monday morning and after the death of the shrimp she turned off the internal filter and aquarium light and NEVER changed the water or removed the dead shrimp.
    the aquarium had live inhabitants for about 2 months at most, it has been about 4 months since the shrimp died. So yes, she had a tank for 4 months with NO water movement, and ONLY office light M-F 8 to 5 -1 hour for lunch and dead and decaying shrimp carcasses.
    I am still extremely confused as to how her plants thrived in this environment! Her Anubis has grown more than any of mine in larger aquariums with regular water changes and direct aquarium light every day for at least 8 hours a day, and power filtration.
    SOMEONE EXPLAIN HOW THIS IS POSSIBLE!
    I am frustrated with this because i dont seem to have very much luck with plants when i go by the recommendations i have seen elsewhere, but she ignores those and "life will find a way" lol.
     
  2. nipat

    nipat Guru Class Expert

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    Low light is good for Anubias.

    And on what floor is her office?
    Swaying building might help move the water gently.
    So you might try moving your room up.
     
  3. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    anubias are unbelievably hardy. Probably would survive in a plastic bag in the closet for months. Decaying shrimp probably provided nutrients, left over food. I'm guessing ammonia was killing her critters and that when converted by bacteria could feed the plant. It wouldn't need much light in such poor conditions, nor much CO2. So enough probably provided by exchange between water and air.

    In larger tanks with many other plants there could be competition for resources that the slow growing anubias is not adapted well to. It grows in places other plants cannot, naturally. So if put in places lots of weedy plants can do well, it would make sense that the edge anubias has in nature is removed and may not grow as well. I doubt you would have seen any other type of plant do okay in that situation.

    those are my thoughts.
     
  4. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Dark, Fetid Tropical Swamp Biotope

    Hi Hector,

    I think ShadowMac has it, a little of Nipat’s building movement wouldn’t hurt.:cool:

    In nature and certainly in the unnatural container gardening we do there are always trade-offs, what may be great conditions for one life-form:) may be toxic to another.:(

    The bias in our hobby, though we may refer to it as “planted aquarium” is really to the animal life with consideration of our plant needs a practical after thought.:eek:

    Shawn of ShadowMac fame got it right; the ammonia that killed the critters (thus producing more ammonia) favored the Anubias that grows in the very tropical West African marshes, slow moving water, deeply shaded, so deeply shaded that it was named for the Egyptian god Anubis, the god of the afterlife. So in the conditions Hector describes are (almost) ideally suited to the Anubias. :rolleyes:

    Dark, fetid tropical swamp is not a biotope most of the “natural” aquarium crowd appreciate, so Anubias spp. in our care tend to live in less than ideal (from the plants point of view) conditions.:cool:

    Biollante
     
    #24 Biollante, Aug 3, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 3, 2011
  5. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Actually you'd very very hard pressed to tour West Africa and find Anubias growing in water.

    Live are found high and dry from the rivers and streams all over the various countries they come from, only one confirmed case I know of, where they found in water.

    They can grow under water........but they are not found there.
     
  6. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Interesting

    Hi Tom,

    That is interesting; I had always understood them to be swamp plants. I did find it strange that I can grow them with other tropical (non-bog or marginal) plants in this (Salt River Valley of Arizona) area.

    Most of the emersed tropical aquarium plants require a lot of humidity and misting, the Anubias seem happy to be tucked well back in the shade of other plants.
    :)

    Biollante
     
  7. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    so would it be possible to grow them in a regular pot with a plant that shades it and requires some moist soil or regular watering? would be a great way to keep many varieties of anubias on hand :D
     
  8. Left C

    Left C Lifetime Members
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    Maybe someone can do a SDSM (shaded dry start method) tank. :D
     
  9. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    ca09afe4.jpg

    Got plenty growing in the air here.
    Same for Bolbitus, HC etc etc.........
     
  10. Left C

    Left C Lifetime Members
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    That's is very nice looking! Tom, is your substrate Dolomite in this aquarium?
     
  11. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Once Again... Into The Ether(Net?)

    HI Shawn,

    Yes.
    :gw The soil doesn't even have to be kept all that moist, actually a nice little plant, I have been told that given a bit of time they actually grow quite large.:)

    Biollante
     
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