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Water Change Methods... KILLING ME!

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by DutchMuch, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Junior Poster

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    So on my sixty five, I have been changing water BY FIVE GALLON BUCKETS, BACK AND FORTH OVER 40 TIMES A WATER CHANGE!!!!
    Ive finally HAD IT, and am now asking You, what methods do you have of doing water changes, equipment, etc!!!!!
     
  2. Jason

    Jason barrreport.com
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    Best money I ever spent was on a NoSpill fill and drain Python

    Http://www.pythonproducts.com/products.html

    I can change and refill 50% of my 330l tanks in less than 30mins and the best part is you can watch TV while its doing it for you :) no more buckets..

    Connect it to your tap, turn tap on, watch TV.. / watch water level also ;)

    This obviously depends if you use 100% tap,
     
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  3. SingAlongWithTsing

    SingAlongWithTsing Junior Poster

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    i built a water change thing out of spare pvc + a garden hose adapter
    [​IMG]

    used one of those top fin breeder boxes + a sponge to dsperse the water while refilling
    [​IMG]

    technically you can drain with this too, i used to attach 2 90-degree elbows and some length of pvc (they weren't glued together )at the end with the strainer so i can adjust how far down the tank i wanna drain. had a spare garden hose to use for draining
     
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  4. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Junior Poster

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    @singalonewithtsing Looks like a good idea, pretty much what im shooting for but able to drain and refill (like you said)
    @Jason Trying to do more of a DIY route to save some money $$$$$, if that's even possible...
     
  5. Jason

    Jason barrreport.com
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    makes sense, for reference the python is basically a water bed fill and drain kit with a tap converter, gravel vac and extra long hose..added

    Waterbed-Fill-and-Drain-Kit.jpg

    ebay or walmart for example sell these for about $10

    im sure if you make something like @SingAlongWithTsing kit and added this to the end it will become the fill and drain with a twist of the bottom part you see in the picture with the screws in..
     
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  6. toads74

    toads74 Lifetime Member
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    Garden hose siphon out the door, and a suitable fitting for the gravel vac. To fill, a pump in the reservoir and a suitable hose with a valve on the end. With a pump you can run a garden hose pretty much anywhere you have a drain, outside access, etc. I gave up on buckets long ago... :cool:
     
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  7. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Junior Poster

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    Ok so this is the plan right now I have,
    Make the thing Tsing posted, but attach a hose to it, for longer range. And the shut on/off valves for retracting water or pushing it into the tank.
    How im going to do this, well idk.
     
  8. Beni

    Beni Member
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    I couldn't agree more. I love my python, and can't imagine water changes without it!
     
  9. Dale Hazey

    Dale Hazey Junior Poster

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    If you can't find that waterbed attachment, home depot and super walmart sell faucet to garden hose adapters, and ball valves. You call pretty much conquer your problems there, unless you need the water to climb an elevation during the draining process. Then you would want a pump.
     
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  10. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    The simplest way is to use an outdoor hose bib, a length of garden hose, and something to hang over the rim of the tank, while diffusing the blast of incoming water. Attach the hose to the hose bib. Run just enough water to move the air out of it. Disconnect from the hose bib and move the end of the hose, with water running from the tank out of it, to where it can water some outdoor plants. Wait until the tank level is down 50% (or whatever you desire). Re-attach the hose to the hose bib. Run water into the tank until the level is where you want it. Shut off the hose bib. Lift the "diffuser" out of the tank, and let whatever water drain back to the tank. Hold the end high enough so no more water flows and move it outdoors. Drain the hose and carefully store the hose until the next water change. Just be sure to add a tank worth of Prime to the tank when you first start adding hose bib water to the tank.

    This works well in the summer, but can chill the tank too much in the winter. For winter use it is a bit more complicated because you need a way to connect to the kitchen or bathroom faucet, so you can use warm water to refill the tank.
     
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  11. slipfinger

    slipfinger Junior Poster

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    What temp is the water that comes out of the outdoor hose bib? I have to mix hot water with my cold water all year long. If I go straight cold water plants would shrivel up and jump out of the tank.
     
  12. Dale Hazey

    Dale Hazey Junior Poster

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    They way VaughnH is describing to siphon I used to empty a hot tub in this fashion. I did this on my tank with the sink adapter until I sprung a leak in the faucet gasket. If you had two ball valves on each end of the garden hose, you could just fill the whole thing with water, then bring it inside. Put one end in the tank, the other into a drain of some kind, instead of running inside and outside. For a diffuser I just use a piece of tuboware with a rock in it so the substrate doesnt get hammered.

    I never hear anyone talk about nitrogen embolism or aging their tank water here? Does anyone worry about these things? My tap water is now 83 at its coldest.
     
  13. slipfinger

    slipfinger Junior Poster

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    Geez, you don't even need to add hot water to have a shower.

    My tap water is a cool 63, the Great Lakes has some cold water.
     
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  14. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    If you do a 50% water change, adding water that is 10 degreed colder than the tank water results in a 5 degrees drop in the tank water temperature. So, if the tank starts at 80 degrees it ends up at 75 degrees. Typical tap water here is no colder than 60F, more likely 65F. If my tank is at 80F, I end up with 70F water at the lowest. That has never had any visible effect on either the plants or fish, probably because the change is fairly slow. Of course in the winter the tap water can be colder so I can't always use that method. I started using that method about 10 years ago, 12 months a year, and I never use expensive or delicate fish. I am now switching to kitchen tap water during the winter, just to be safe.
     
  15. toads74

    toads74 Lifetime Member
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    There's a gadget called a siphon starter... instead of running back and forth to the hose bib... ;)

    And put a garden hose wye adapter so you don't have to unscrew the hose, or use a quick connect.
     
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