UV light?

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Brian20

Guest
Well, i saw fluorecent lamps that produces UV light to help animals, etc.. These fluorecent can help plants too?

Only curious
 

jonny_ftm

Guru Class Expert
Mar 5, 2009
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I don't think
Also, during maintenance, we can pass some time behind aquarium lights, exposing our skin to UV. Personally, I'll avoid it. Plants do well without them anyway
 

Tug

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Put the posters up and turn on the black light! Not groovy, man.
 
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B

Brian20

Guest
So, UV not have nothing with plant grow or ecosistem?? Im only curious, because in nature plants receive all this rays from the sun.
 

Philosophos

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As far as I know all you're getting from UV would be melanoma and long-term retinal issues. Plants form some weird growths (some sort of metaplasia?) from certain frequencies of UV light that algae can't cope with. Still, neither are ideal.

I'm betting this is quackery along the lines of magnet magic copper ultrasonic holy water available for 6 easy installments of $29.99.

Do you have a link?
 

Biollante

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If You Are A Lizard, It Is Not Quackery

Hi Brian, All,

I assume (always dangerous) that these are the black lights available at, for instance, Wal-Mart. Black lights are UVA, wavelength from 400 nm to 315 nm, energy of 3.10–3.94 eV per photon.

I seriously doubt they will do you any harm. :)

Or they may be the low level UVA/UVB herpetology or herpetoculture lights, a combination of the black light and UVB, wavelength from 315 nm to 280 nm, energy of 3.94–4.43 eV per photon.

I suppose if you worked at it the UVB could hurt you, we use them for our reptiles and some birds, as far as I know, no one has been harmed by them.

I think plants can gain benefit from UVA to a limited extent, I do not think UVB is any use to plants.

Our UV sterilizers are UVC, wavelength from 280 nm–100 nm, energy of 4.43–12.4 eV per photon. These are getting into the dangerous range.

Biollante
 
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shoggoth43

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Definitely do not use a UV sterilizer lamp over your tank. Much like playing with fibre in the datacenters, it's just safer not to look at/in ANYTHING related to UV or infrared. No good will come of it.

For the most part, unless you have something specifically that would benefit from it, such as a reptile, you can safely pass on these lamps. Alternately, break out the sunglasses and have at it. I suspect you won't find much difference except to your wallet but you never know.

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S


Biollante;48752 said:
Hi Brian, All,

I assume (always dangerous) that these are the black lights available at, for instance, Wal-Mart. Black lights are UVA, wavelength from 400 nm to 315 nm, energy of 3.10–3.94 eV per photon.

I seriously doubt they will do you any harm. :)

Or they may be the low level UVA/UVB herpetology or herpetoculture lights, a combination of the black light and UVB, wavelength from 315 nm to 280 nm, energy of 3.94–4.43 eV per photon.

I suppose if you worked at it the UVB could hurt you, we use them for our reptiles and some birds, as far as I know, no one has been harmed by them.

I think plants can gain benefit from UVA to a limited extent, I do not think UVB is any use to plants.

Our UV sterilizers are UVC, wavelength from 280 nm–100 nm, energy of 4.43–12.4 eV per photon. These are getting into the dangerous range.

Biollante