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Use of leonardite in substrate

Discussion in 'Advanced Strategies and Fertilization' started by Azmi, Feb 26, 2005.

  1. Azmi

    Azmi Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

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    Hi Tom,
    I've read a few of your previous posts where you mentioned using leonardite in the substrate. As I understand leonardite is derived from coal?? I wonder if you explain a little bit more about leonardite or recommend alternatives. I'm in Singapore and I haven't seen it in the local shops. I haven't found anyone other than yourself talking about it in the local forums.
    Thanks.

    Azmi
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
    Staff Member Administrator Social Group Admin

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    Re: Use of leonardite in substrate

    It's really old peat, peat is really old plant detritus(mulm). Old leonardite is coal.

    It's a carbon source for bacteria that last a very long time, so small amount of Carbon are available, it adds some small amounts of humics as well.

    General Hydroponics sells it. Dupla make something like it as well in pellet form.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
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