uprooting plant technique?

JadeButterfly

Guru Class Expert
Jan 23, 2005
115
0
16
Hello,

I was wondering if there is a proper way or easy way to uproot plants?

I remember two months ago when I wanted to remove my glosso carpet, it was such a hassle! It took me nearly a month to fully remove it (only removed a portion every week followed by a water change)

I was just in the tank ripping them out and all the mulm was just floating all over!

I just wanted to know if there is any uprooting technique for future reference...in case I ever want to sell my plants or remove them, I want to do them nicely.

I know some ppl have sword plants or stem plants that are over few years old and the roots are probably spread all over under the substrate...If you simply cut the plant and leave the roots in, won't the roots rot?

Your comments?
 

matpat

Prolific Poster
Mar 29, 2005
74
0
6
54
Dayton, Ohio
Re: uprooting plant technique?

With foreground plants like glosso, Hairgrass or E. tenellus, I turn off the filters and pull of the "lawn". I have never had much luck removing just a section of it so I pull up the whole thing and replant. With the filters off, the mulm doesn't spread around the tank as much. I let the mulm selltle for a bit while I trim the rest of the tank, then do a big water change.

I've done the same thing for the one and only large sword I've kept. Larger crypts I use the same procedure. With the sword, I had an extra set of hands with a gravel vac to help collect some of the mulm. It had roots everywhere in my 75g tank! Having the filters off is a definate plus for later cleanup.
 

srozell

Guru Class Expert
Jan 24, 2005
110
0
16
Re: uprooting plant technique?

JadeButterfly said:
I know some ppl have sword plants or stem plants that are over few years old and the roots are probably spread all over under the substrate...If you simply cut the plant and leave the roots in, won't the roots rot?

For large swords like E. Horemanii I use a small spade and cut the roots a few inches from the plant. It leaves roots in the tank, and yes they rot, but the nutrients from the rotting roots are soon consumed by the other plants.