The noob guide to building your own regulator: part numbers, sources, and other tips!

Left C

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I suggest that you get the B model (0-60psi gauge) VTS250 series if you are using a diffuser that requires up to approx 30 psi and also use it for general all around use. I like the A model (0-30psi gauge) because I use low pressure diffusers. The C model (0-100psi gauge) will still work fine, but I prefer the A or B models over the C models. The D model (0-200psi gauge) will also work, but it offers less control in the lower psi range. In other words, for our use, the preference order goes like this: B - A - C - D . (My preferential order is: A - B - C - D .) I usually look for the VTS253 models over the VTS250 and VTS252 models. The VTS253 models are a newer release.

outlet pressure ranges reference: http://victortechnologies.com/IM_Uploads/DocLib_2310_56-0623 VTS 250 Series Regulators.pdf
(0-30psi gauge): 2-15psig
(0-60psi gauge): 2-40psig
(0-100psi gauge): 4-80psig
(0-200psi gauge): 5-125psig

[attachment=1423:name]

Capture VTS250 series pressure ranges.jpg
 

kevmo911

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hsverma;94665 said:
Lastly, I am getting really confused about all these fitting sizes like 1/4, 1/8, tubing etc. Is there a simple write-up or guide somewhere I can read to enhance my knowledge? I tried searching these forums and it confused the hell out of me :(

When we talk about 1/8" or 1/4", we're usually talking about NPT thread size. Think of the sizes more as a reference number, as the sizes are not an obvious measurement. 1/8" NPT threads are actually about 0.4" in diameter, and 1/4" NPT threads are just over 1/2" in diameter.

As for tubing, we're usually talking about double ferrule compression fittings. There are two ferrules and a nut that screw on to a unique thread type. For size, 1/4" and 1/8" are the actual sizes of the holes in the nuts.


I hope this answers what I *think* your question is ;)
 

hsverma

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kevmo911;94726 said:
When we talk about 1/8" or 1/4", we're usually talking about NPT thread size. Think of the sizes more as a reference number, as the sizes are not an obvious measurement. 1/8" NPT threads are actually about 0.4" in diameter, and 1/4" NPT threads are just over 1/2" in diameter.

As for tubing, we're usually talking about double ferrule compression fittings. There are two ferrules and a nut that screw on to a unique thread type. For size, 1/4" and 1/8" are the actual sizes of the holes in the nuts.


I hope this answers what I *think* your question is ;)

That clears up a lot of confusion. Thank you.


Now, I have a question about the solenoids: will the 24V DC models of 6011 work for our application as long as I have the correct power supply? Technically it should, but i have been wrong with these things before and would like to ask before I get one.
 

Darkblade48

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Dec 16, 2009
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hsverma;94841 said:
Now, I have a question about the solenoids: will the 24V DC models of 6011 work for our application as long as I have the correct power supply? Technically it should, but i have been wrong with these things before and would like to ask before I get one.
Yes, it will.

Just make sure you get the correct power supply.
 

hsverma

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Thank you Anthony. I was able to grab one of these from Ebay for 25+11 shipping. They included a DIN connector with LED already attached and 1/8" NPT fittings.

Now, I was at a local welding shop getting my CO2 cylinder refilled and getting a CGA320 nut+nipple and they had some surplus parts in a basket pretty cheap. I saw two needle valve looking devices and got both of them (just in case) for a phenomenal deal. Now I am confused what kind of connectors they have and can I even use them for aquarium CO2 purpose. I am attaching a few pics below for reference. Could someone please take a look and let me know whether I can use these or not and what fittings I will need to connect them to the regulator and solenoid?

Needle valve one (small connectors and ferrlules):

CAB13700-0801-41E9-AF65-CFC2565B3591-5265-0000038583286797_zpsaa2c8fea.jpg

0F3DA0DF-5067-4B55-A7A5-C085F7BF1DAC-5265-0000038580E618B2_zps54bfbcdf.jpg


Needle valve big (big connectors and markings on the adjustment knob):

C3BAEB91-351D-47A1-B302-059EA741D8D6-5265-00000383ECDC7A03_zps83e954d1.jpg
 
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Darkblade48

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Dec 16, 2009
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The first metering valve reminds me of a SS2-A

The second one has the model number printed on the side.

(If the first one is the SS2-A), then both are usable.

They use tube fittings - you can use tubing to run the metering valve inline if you want (i.e. run an NPT to hose barb converter on your solenoid and connect the tubing between the solenoid and metering valve).

Alternatively, you can purchase tubing to NPT fittings so that the metering valve can be mounted.
 

hsverma

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Darkblade48;94889 said:
They use tube fittings - you can use tubing to run the metering valve inline if you want (i.e. run an NPT to hose barb converter on your solenoid and connect the tubing between the solenoid and metering valve).

To check my understanding, this is what you mean: Regulator ---> Solenoid (use this 1/8" NPT to barb on solenoid SS-2-HC-1-2) ---> use co2 tubing to connect the barbed adapter on the metering valve using this adapter (SS-6M5-4M) ---> then on the other side of metering valve have another SS-6M5-4M connected to the tubing connector with CO2 tubing attached ----> Have a check valve going to the aquarium

Alternatively, you can purchase tubing to NPT fittings so that the metering valve can be mounted.

to mount the metering valve, all I need is a SS-2-TA-1-2 with the male 1/8" end connected to the solenoid and the tubing end connected to the metering valve. Then on the output of the metering valve, I can directly mount the CO2 tubing using this barb adapter SS-6M5-4M.

Do I have it partially correct or am I completely off?
 

kevmo911

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The reference to the SS-6M5-4M is throwing me. I was all set to link a bunch of Swagelok items, and then started wondering about the measurements. You can't connect the same length of tubing to a SS-2-HC-1-2 on one end and SS-6M5-4M inside a nut and ferrule set designed for 1/4,1/8 tubing on the other end. Which size are you using, or are you going to use both in different sections?

But one other thing - that first valve, if the ferrules are stock, would be a B-SS2-A - Swagelok doesn't bother to chrome-coat the ferrules in brass valves. If you're going to use tube adapters with it, you might want brass tube adapters. The color will clash with the valve, but there's some concern of brass and SS not sealing well in compression fittings.
 

kevmo911

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The previous post was regarding inline connections. For mounted, it's a bit more straightforward.

For the first valve, if it's brass, B-2-TA-1-2 (SS-2-TA-1-2 if you really don't like the brass color and are willing to take a chance with sealing)
For the second valve, SS-4-TA-1-2.
 

Darkblade48

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Dec 16, 2009
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kevmo911;94898 said:
The previous post was regarding inline connections. For mounted, it's a bit more straightforward.

For the first valve, if it's brass, B-2-TA-1-2 (SS-2-TA-1-2 if you really don't like the brass color and are willing to take a chance with sealing)
For the second valve, SS-4-TA-1-2.

This is good. These adapters will convert from the tube fitting to the standard 1/8" NPT (male). You can just use a standard hose barb adapter (that screws into a 1/8" male NPT end).

Not sure where SS-6M5-4M fits into all this, as kevmo911 mentioned.

Also, I was told by Swagelok that SS and brass do not mix (and was the first one to report it, apparently :)). I would advise against using SS and live with the colour clash as I did.
 

hsverma

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Darkblade48;94916 said:
This is good. These adapters will convert from the tube fitting to the standard 1/8" NPT (male). You can just use a standard hose barb adapter (that screws into a 1/8" male NPT end).

Not sure where SS-6M5-4M fits into all this, as kevmo911 mentioned.

Also, I was told by Swagelok that SS and brass do not mix (and was the first one to report it, apparently :)). I would advise against using SS and live with the colour clash as I did.


Thank you both Kevmo911 and Anthony. If I have everything stainless steel including the regulator and the solenoid, will the SS swagelok parts be ok?
 

iani

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Oct 1, 2011
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It will be fine to use stainless adapters with the 22 series metering valve. The problem would be with your SS series valve, it looks like a chrome plated brass valve (the ferrules are brass). If it actually is chrome plated brass you should use brass tube adapters for the SS series valve.
 

Flyinghellfish

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Dec 26, 2011
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What about SS CGA 320 stem into a brass regulator? Or having the 1/4 outlet reducer SS then having SS fittings all the way from there?
 

Darkblade48

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Flyinghellfish;94967 said:
What about SS CGA 320 stem into a brass regulator? Or having the 1/4 outlet reducer SS then having SS fittings all the way from there?
Both could cause problems.
 

Flyinghellfish

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:( Not too sure what to do now, I have the SS Parker H3, so I brought all SS fittings (so very expensive) but I have a chrome brass CGA 320 stem/nut.

Update: Picked up another SS fitting at Swagelok, told me the best would be a brass Female into a SS male. Of course they still said it is not recommend, but as long as you don't torque too much. It's a bummer though, Parker SS CGA 320 stem/nut coming in 2 weeks.

Check out what J and R added to my package, I told them to draw me a fish as a joke.

YZ8KDZOl.jpg
 
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Matt F.

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You don't have to worry about electrolysis when it comes to using brass/stainless parts. But, if it's a compression fitting, they are usually engineered to use one type of metal. So in that case, I'd use stainless ferrules on a stainless fitting.
 
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D-Linquent

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Since I'm having noob problems, I'm just posting in this thread. If you guys are trying to keep this clean, I can post my issues in another thread. Just let me know.

Okay, I have all of the parts to start my regulator, and I'm stuck on the first step. I'm trying to replace the old nut and nipple, but that thing doesn't want to come loose. Can I use a lubricant like WD-40 on it, or will potentially put that lubricant into my system?

There's a part of me that knows this is funny, but then there's the other part of me that wants to throw the darn thing. :)
 

oldpunk

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Dec 1, 2009
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You just need more torque. I use an impact wrench to remove those things most of the time.
 

kevmo911

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I've had good success with a large pipe wrench.

And a bench vise is always helpful. It's also not a bad multipurpose investment if you don't own one.

Not sure WD-40 will do much for seized threads. But a propane torch might.