Target CO2

ILuvMyGoldBarb

Junior Poster
Jun 26, 2007
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Well, my tank is right at 30ppm for CO2. That level of CO2 has my pH right at 5.5. Normally that would concern me except this is my Discus tank. My Rams love it and my Rummynose and Neons are as bright as can be.

The big question I have is this, I have been running an air stone at night for the benefit of the Discus since my tank tempis at a steady 82, is this really necessary or am I doing more harm than good for the tank by doing so?
 

Tom Barr

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Jan 23, 2005
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Probably not, make sure you have decent surface movement also.
Then you really do not need the added aeration at night.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

SpongeBob SquarePlants

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Dec 11, 2006
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This is very similar to what I was doing. I too have discus and long before I knew what I was doing I had a Pinpoint PH controller running my CO2. I eventually switched to running the CO2 for 11 hours a day on a timer and the PH controller just reads about 5.5 all day. I used to run my air stone at night thinking it would make the fish happy also. The only negative thing I found was my PH went up/CO2 went down alot more than when I didn't run the O2 at night. So it took longer for the CO2 to level out in the morning. The return for my main filter is mounted a few inches below the water surface. In the past I used to fill my tank up quite a bit, now I don't fill it as much so my return spray bar creates some really good surface movement.

I will note that, I use the needle valve with a bulle counter (not that I actually count any bubbles) but with my CO2 flow rate set the way it is, I'm getting really good plant growth and pearling. I did notice a few species of fish hanging out at the surface, not so much as gasping but like they are about to, around 4pm (after 6 hours of CO2). So what I did was put my air pump on a timer so that from 4pm to 5pm the O2 runs with the CO2. It helps to degas the tank a little. The CO2 then runs full blast from 5pm till 9pm. I see a very slight raise in PH from the hours of O2, but the fish are very happy now with no air at night and 11 hours of CO2 a day.

PS. I turn on the CO2 1 hour before lights on (10 hours of light)

Good Luck!
 

Tom Barr

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I have also added pure O2 as a method o keep the O2 ppms at 9ppm all the time.
You can get a O2 bottle and O2 regulator used pretty cheap, I add a needle valve and then bubble it in slowly at about 1 bubble per second per 150 gal.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Barney

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Jun 30, 2007
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Tom Barr;18219 said:
I have also added pure O2 as a method o keep the O2 ppms at 9ppm all the time.
You can get a O2 bottle and O2 regulator used pretty cheap, I add a needle valve and then bubble it in slowly at about 1 bubble per second per 150 gal.

Regards,
Tom Barr

Just curious, how do you check that the O2 is at 9ppm?
 

Tom Barr

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I use a DO meter.
But they also make a number of test kits that measure O2 levels that are fairly cheap.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Barney

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Jun 30, 2007
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Thanks, I really should have used google before asking. i always assumed you needed expensive equipment to mesaure O2 levels. didnt know you could just buy test kits. :)
 

Tom Barr

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I think Tetra makes one that will go to about 10ppm.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Professor Myers

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Aug 24, 2006
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Tom Barr;18219 said:
I have also added pure O2 as a method o keep the O2 ppms at 9ppm all the time.
You can get a O2 bottle and O2 regulator used pretty cheap, I add a needle valve and then bubble it in slowly at about 1 bubble per second per 150 gal.

Regards,
Tom Barr

What is the means of distribution ? Do you bubble it directly into the tank, through a reactor, or add it through a trikle filter ?

Is this a continuous rate or is it switched by a controller ? Thanks, Prof M
 

Crazy Loaches

Guru Class Expert
Nov 20, 2006
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I'm curious as well.

Are the 'cheap' O2 test kits accurate at all (like the cheap co2 test LOL).

I'm thinking of probably getting a Neptune AC3 controller for my current tank project and did happen to notice they have an optional O2 probe... but it is like almost $500.

The reason I am interested is that my tank will be a large tank for loaches which many say require more oxygen - since they are mostly native to faster flowing rivers and such. And I am thinking of having a group of redline barbs which I believe are riverfish as well.

If it would be of any help I would definately consider adding pressurized O2... but since my tank will be overflow/sump would simply the water falling a couple inches over the internal overflow be enough to keep it oxygenated? I'm trying to keep the rest of the system splash/noise free by like having the overflow drain submerged in the sump, and using a durso style standpipe (submerged intake).
 

Professor Myers

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Aug 24, 2006
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Crazy Loaches;18281 said:
I'm curious as well.

Are the 'cheap' O2 test kits accurate at all (like the cheap co2 test LOL).

I'm thinking of probably getting a Neptune AC3 controller for my current tank project and did happen to notice they have an optional O2 probe... but it is like almost $500.

The reason I am interested is that my tank will be a large tank for loaches which many say require more oxygen - since they are mostly native to faster flowing rivers and such. And I am thinking of having a group of redline barbs which I believe are riverfish as well.

If it would be of any help I would definately consider adding pressurized O2... but since my tank will be overflow/sump would simply the water falling a couple inches over the internal overflow be enough to keep it oxygenated? I'm trying to keep the rest of the system splash/noise free by like having the overflow drain submerged in the sump, and using a durso style standpipe (submerged intake).

I have been using Hyperbaric pressure inside standard drip tray trickle chambers for years, but last year I adapted the system into my planted tanks.

The greatest conflict is between the internal air pressure of the chamber, and the hydrologic pressure of the gravity drain into the trickle filter. Using standard bulkhead fittings I can only achieve 10X circulation within the system before it stalls (@ an ambient internal pressure of 6-7 PSI ) AP Is not a problem per se but when you exceed 7 psi you need to be absolutely certain of the structural integrity of the chamber or you risk blowing it all to white man's hell ! :eek:

Using tanked O2 you can simply pressurize directly within an O2 reactor, bye passing the general circulation within the system in a dedicated fashion.

The question remaining is whether anything is really to be gained by doing so ?

O2 is already at appx. 9-9.4 using the HB reactor. As far as Loaches go...Yes they are all thriving, and goofy as livin hell !!! :p Regarding the other fishes in the system all are presently breeding including Corys, Farlows and Cardinals

This has caused no conflicts W/ degassing of Co2 as the chamber is sealed so any Co2 degassed is actually returned in the same chamber. As a matter of fact it actually added greater stability in Co2 levels decreasing the peaks in fluctuation overall.

My question is How High Is Up ^ ??? :confused: and whether anything is to be gained by going W/ pure o2 ?

Foregoing the initial expense of equipment, the inherrent risk of tanked o2, and the ongoing expense of o2. There would be less inherrent noise within the system, it would certainly require less space, it definitely has applictions for cannister filter systems, but none of these issues directly effect my own situation.

Mi Dos Centavos, Prof M