Super easy method to start a new tank without any algae, any issues,dosing etc

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fwplantfan

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Jan 15, 2008
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Tom Barr;19959 said:
If you are using anything other than say soil, ADAQ aqua soil, then you need some form of fertilizer for flourite, EC, SMS, plain sand etc, and it needs NPK+ micros.


Regards,
Tom Barr

New to this so bear please bear with me if I ask dumb questions. I currently have a 20 XH tank that is planted and I am slowly stumbling my way through the learning curve of CO2 and ferts. Setting up a 33 Gallon planted tank. Substrate is 2-3" of Flourite Black. Lighting will be 2x39w T5 HO. Was hoping to grow glosso or HC and this looks like the way to go. I am hoping to learn and get into dosing dry ferts using the EI method but at the momment am limited basically to flouish product from my lfs. My question is this: A number of times I have seen references to dosing NPK. Is there a product out there with all three or is it simply a short form for adding all 3 macros?
 

VaughnH

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It is shorthand for the same three elements that terrestrial fertilizer shows on the package - 10-10-5, means 10% Nitrogen, 10 percent potassium, 5 percent phosphorous. We use nitrates for nitrogen, potassium nitrate or sulfate for potassium, and phosphate for phosphorous. There is no economical product that combines those for aquatic plants, but Seachem sells Flourish Nitrogen, Flourish Potassium, and Flourish Phosphorous, which do provide all three, but at a big cost for a big tank. Buying dry fertilizers, KNO3 and KH2PO4 makes the most sense economically.
 

fwplantfan

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Jan 15, 2008
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VaughnH;23005 said:
It is shorthand for the same three elements that terrestrial fertilizer shows on the package - 10-10-5, means 10% Nitrogen, 10 percent potassium, 5 percent phosphorous. We use nitrates for nitrogen, potassium nitrate or sulfate for potassium, and phosphate for phosphorous. There is no economical product that combines those for aquatic plants, but Seachem sells Flourish Nitrogen, Flourish Potassium, and Flourish Phosphorous, which do provide all three, but at a big cost for a big tank. Buying dry fertilizers, KNO3 and KH2PO4 makes the most sense economically.

Thanks! I have the Flourish Iron, and have bought a nitrogen as well. I did read that when dosing, DO NOT Raise nitrates all in one shot as it is harmful ( ie fatal) to the fish. Is dosing Flourish NITROGEN the same? ie Does dosing the nitrogen produce nitrates in teh tank and need I worry about over dosing?
 

Tom Barr

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NO3 are fine to raise by 10-20 ppm in a shot.

Whoever said that is well, full of crap.
It's not the least bit true and the research shows that it's a long way off from toxic levels(at least 1-2 orders of magnitude).

Fish need good acclimation to a new tank, mostly KH, and general salts, but 10-20ppm of KNO3 is not much in terms of salt adjustment for fish.

They are making assumptions without looking up anything(not doing their homework/background research), nor testing under a controlled condition to see if the assumption is true or not for a wide variety of fish(too lazy to test or answer their own hypothesis).

I'm a bit harsh, but rightly so, if someone does not bother to look anything up or test, what good are their statements/opinions?

It adds to myths and balony, which we already have plenty of in this hobby and serves to confuse a muddle success.

I'd suggest using ADA AS and running EI at about 1/2 dosing for this tank, you really need to focus on good current and lots of CO2.

Water changes etc, add Amano shrimps after 2-3 weeks etc.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

TW3

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Sep 13, 2007
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Hi, I have just started up a new tank today with this method, using ADA. I have set my lights to run a total of 12 hours a day. 8 hours will be at 1.3wpg & 4 hours at 2.77wpg.

Should I alter my lighting levels at all?

Thanks in advance.
 

orion2001

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Mar 27, 2008
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You could probably run your lights at full intensity for the whole duration as you really have little risk of developing any algae. Just make sure the water level is around half an inch below the substrate. You should definitely not have any pools of water above the surface level. If you do, it can lead to algae growing all over your substrate.

Good luck!
 

TW3

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Sep 13, 2007
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Thanks for the info. I do have water above substrate in some places. Will fix that tonight.

Also, how will riccia, attached to rocks fair with this method - will they dry out too much.
 

orion2001

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Mar 27, 2008
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I think if you keep the tank humid and mist often they should probably do OK. I have no idea for sure though. My java fern did horribly and I had to get rid of it. But in my case I don't keep the humidity too high.
 

DaveSurfer

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Mar 14, 2005
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I'm just going to be setting up a new 33 gallon aquarium. I have the black onyx sand for substrate and only plan on using that. Would that be ok for emersion planting?

Just mist the plants with traces and NPK or pour it into the substrate?


Tom, when you say cover the tank you just mean make sure that there is a canopy on the top to prevent moisture from leaving?

Thanks!
 

Gerryd

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Dave,

Yes, just cover the tank like with glass lids to keep moisture in and the humidity higher........else the substrate and plants will quickly dry out under the lights.
 

Tom Barr

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Basic concept: no different than growing terrarium plants, keeping terrarium, google that topic if you have questions.

This is not neurological surgery here(hopefully :) .

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

DaveSurfer

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Tom Barr;29688 said:
Basic concept: no different than growing terrarium plants, keeping terrarium, google that topic if you have questions.

This is not neurological surgery here(hopefully :) .

Regards,
Tom Barr

Sounds pretty basic, thanks. What, if any, stem plants can grow emersed? I would like to try java fern growing on driftwood while I'm doing the HC carpeting...though I don't think Java is considered a "stem plant" I have seen it dry out.
 
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