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Sump, reactor and pump

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by rafel, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. rafel

    rafel Junior Poster

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    I noticed that the output of my Eheim 2228 cannister filter is not adequate to power the AM1000 CO2 reactor. I am thinking of using an Eheim 1060 that is sitting idle in the store.

    Questions:

    1. The Eheim 1060 is rated at about 600 gph. Wouldn't that be too strong for the AM1000? If it is too strong, how do I reduce the flow?

    2. The Eheim 1060 is designed to be used in a sump. Can I just get a 1.5' tank and use that as a sump?

    3. Do I need to siphon water from the tank into the sump (where the Eheim 1060 sits in) or would it be better to feed the sump with water from the output of the Eheim 2228 ?

    Appreciate all comments. Thank you.
     
  2. rafel

    rafel Junior Poster

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    Really need advices on the above. Thanks.
     
  3. Gerryd

    Gerryd Plant Guru Team
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    Hi Refel,

    If you could give some more details on tank size and such it is always easier to provide better advice :)

    I have powered this reactor with a Mag drive 500 gph pump. I used a throttle valve to limit flow to the reactor. I don't think 600 gph will kill it and this will decrease as the filter clogs.

    Any solid watertight container can be a sump if the appropriate size and materials you want. Your bigger issue is #3.

    Your sump always has to have enough water in it to cover the pump intake strainer. You could just use a 5 gallon bucket and top it off every couple of days :)

    Or you can install a CPR brand overflow to feed it but then the sump size needs to be matched to the overflow rate and your pump.

    I would try and find a small external pump you can use.

    I would be leery of using the other canister output to feed the sump as you have to get it adjusted just right so as not to overflow the sump container.

    Some 'sump' pumps have connections where you can hook hose/fittings to directly so they can be used externally, unless the water is needed to keep it cool and from running dry...........

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. rafel

    rafel Junior Poster

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    I want to do this with my 180g.

    First time though that I have heard about that brand and I have gone to their website and look at their video. Very nice but am very concerned about too much degassing of CO2.

    Is/are there any pump that I can use externally that does not require a sump? I mean, I just need to hook, say, 1/2" hose to my tank and connect the other end to the pump's intake. Then hook the output of the pump to my AM1000? Is this possible?
     
  5. rafel

    rafel Junior Poster

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    Gerry, something just came to mind.

    Now lets say my setup is as follows:
    - suitable size sump sitting in my cabinet under the tank
    - I ran a hose from the tank to the sump and suck the other end to start the siphoning
    - in the sump I have a pump. It sucks in water from the sump and feed that into my AM1000, finally back to the tank.


    What if suddenly there is a power outage? The pump in the sump will stop BUT water from the tank still continue flowing down to the sump. How do you counter such situation?
     
  6. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    180 is almost the max limit for an AM 1000, even with a 1060.
    The in/out flows are only 3/8", so that is the limiting factor.

    I'd suggest using the same general design as the AM, but use clear PVC, and make your own DIY version(see here in the article section subforum), use barbed 1/2 or 3/4" in/out lets and make it 16" long etc.

    I'd also put two long 3/16" rigid tubers inside the chamber like the AM 1000, so you can measure the bubble rate easier and use 2 needle valves, one for each tube.

    Then run the 1060 with that.
    This would cost you about 20-25 $ to make, vs 70-80$ for the AM1000.


    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  7. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    With that setup you really won't be able to counter the problem. You have a couple of options. There may be other options as well.

    1) Build/buy a proper overflow box and you're set. Power outages will not affect your siphon or sump. Take the output from your main pump and run it through the AM1000 and then to the tank. ( single pump setup )

    2) Start the siphon you mentioned, feed that through your pump, then to your AM1000, and then run that back up to the tank and skip the sump. ( dedicated recirculating line ) This method does not require a sump and power outages will have no affect on it. Probably one of the more efficient uses of a pump as only the internal plumbing resistance for the most part will affect the throughput.

    3) Assuming your sump is fed from an overflow, take the water from the sump and run it through your pump, then the AM1000, and either return the water to the sump ( more efficient ) or to the tank if your overflow will handle both pumps' output and you want the extra flow in the tank. ( dual pump setup )

    -
    S
     
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