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Sump - Biological

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by jonathan11, May 24, 2009.

  1. jonathan11

    jonathan11 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Is it recommended to leave the portion of the sump containing bio balls uncovered, to better establish a bacterial colony, by contact with air (O2)?

    Walter :D :D :D
     
  2. Philosophos

    Philosophos Lifetime Charter Member
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    My experience with wet-dry is zero, but that being said I've never needed to expose my bacteria culture to increased levels of oxygen beyond that available to a canister. I don't get dangerous mini-cycles even when I seed from another filter. Cultures of the same bacteria in oceans and lakes have been fine without wet/dry as well. Nitrifying bacteria is tough stuff; pretty essential to all life on earth. Some extra O2 might help, but it's certainly not vital.

    -Philosophos
     
  3. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    For the Wet/Dry part you should have the bioballs, or whatever, out of the water for best effectiveness. Unless you have a high fish load, leaving them submerged will cause no harm. The point of the Wet/Dry filter was to have high stocking levels of critters before people figured out that whole live rock thing in reefs. Wet/Dry was adapted from the water treatment industry where speed/economy of space/cost/time was required.

    -
    S
     
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