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Starting to plan my next tank - 75 gallons

Discussion in 'Are you new to aquatic plants? Start here' started by Tamelesstgr, Jan 17, 2011.

  1. Tamelesstgr

    Tamelesstgr Junior Poster

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    I have settled on a standard 75 gallon for my next tank and I would like to know if I am headed in the right direction with lighting for the plants I would like to grow.

    So, 75 gallon (48x18x21) with a Rena XP3 Canister or equivalent, 2 heaters. I also plan on having additional circulation via a powerhead. Substrate will be Oildri for the open unplanted area and I plan on using some left over colorquartz for the planted areas. I will supplement the substrate with rootmedic tabs as necessary. I plan on dosing Excel and Flourish and the EI method for fertilization.

    Plant list:
    Java Fern "Narrow"
    Crypt Balanese (Background)
    Vallisneria "Nana" (Background)
    Chain Sword (Foreground)
    Dwarf Hairgrass
    Fissidens and other mosses

    I'm trying to emmulate this tank:
    [​IMG]

    I have settled on (1) Solarmax T5HE 2x28W 48Inch Hood w/ Moonlights and thought about adding (1) Solarmax T5HE 1x28W 48Inch Hood to help spread out the light, or to be used for a shorter photoperiod. I could even run 1 light on the dual fixture and the single fixture at the same time if I was running 2 bulbs on a timer.

    With the single T5NO fixture I should be in the Medium range according to Hoppy's wonderful table. Given the list of plants I have selected, these are all "Medium" light plants.

    I have had PC lighting before and really wanted to try the T5's, and for both fixtures from Petblvd it would cost me $100 bucks delivered. Just want to make sure that light will accomplish what I want. I don't need crazy growth, just the normal out of these plants.

    Your thoughts are welcome. Thanks,
    Ken
     
  2. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Deep Sand Bed

    Hi Ken,

    I think you are on the right track... :)

    I would advise dry ferts for the EI. :gw

    I am not sure the Excel will be necessary and given the mosses and Vallisneria "Nana" might be counter productive.:rolleyes:

    A light layer of Osmocote Plus in the substrate would help get things started.:)

    Should you be the patient sort you can skip the Rena XP3 Canister;

    • I would start with thin layer of peat moss, but then am an evil plant monster and likely nuts :eek:
    • mix 1 part kitty litter to 2 or 3 parts pool filter sand
    • for a depth of (at least) three inches (8 centimeters), your color-quartz as you please
    • lay in a sparse layer of Osmocote Plus before putting the last three-quarter-inch ( 2 centimeters) of substrate.

    If when you say “Chain Sword," if you mean Echinodorus tenellus, I seriously recommend Dwarf Sagittaria, Sagittaria subulata instead.

    Good luck,
    Biollante
     
  3. Tamelesstgr

    Tamelesstgr Junior Poster

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    Thanks for your reply. What do you mean about avoiding a canister filter?

    I have read a little about the Omsocote "ferticles" on TPT forum.

    When dosing Excel I have not had any issues with my anubias, and I have kept italiam vals without melting issues.
     
  4. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Or A Sump... A Little Wet/Dry Action

    Hi Ken,

    Given your choice of plants and your substrate; a deep sand bed (DSB) along with your plants will provide excellent filtration as long as you do not go overboard with the critters, especially avoiding messy eaters. Though once established the tanks really take off and can handle most, even provide tasty treats, particularly if you inoculate your tank/substrate appropriately.;)

    In this context Osmocote Plus (or not “plused” for that matter) is a bit of cheat, a head start, certainly not a requirement. :)

    Your experience with Excel is what it is, still mosses, primitive plants in general are a potential problem. Glutaraldehyde is a biocide. :eek:

    Biollante
     
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