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Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by craynerd, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. craynerd

    craynerd Junior Poster

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    Hi,

    I have been debating this with a few hobbiests for a while now and would like the get Toms and other members opinions.

    Should aquasoil be replaced after ~12 months and if so why?

    I have heard a few times that it should be but i am now very unclear about the situation.

    Chris
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
    Staff Member Administrator Social Group Admin

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    Re: Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

    I'm not certain, the effects on growth likely are reduced after 12-24 months.
    But using the EI and good water column ferts does not cause any issues and will increase the time, since less is drawn from the substrate.

    I think it depends on what you call depleted and how you like to fertilize etc.
    Some might opt to do this replacement, but I dout many will.


    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  3. detlef

    detlef Subscriber

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    Re: Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

    Chris,

    I have used AS in one tank for more than 2 years without noticing any negativ effects on plant growth (Eusteralis, Rotalas, Ludwigia, Micranthemum, Glosso). Yet I started fertilizing AS with ADA iron bottom and multi bottom after about 4 months on a regular basis.

    Regards,
    Detlef
     
  4. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

    If we were farmers, growing tomatoes, corn, wheat, etc. on our rich river loam farms, would we be thinking about replacing the soil now that it is depleted? Nope, we would have been fertilizing all along, and would only be adjusting our fertilizing to account for the lower level of natural nutrients in the soil. I don't see how our under water "farming" is any different.
     
  5. aquabillpers

    aquabillpers Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

    The nutrients in the topsoil substrate used in Walstad-type natural tanks becomes exhausted in a year or two. Supposedly the natural processes in the tank will then provide the required nutrients, if there are enough fish and plants present.

    If that is true for topsoil substrates, it should also be true for the boutique substrates like ADA. Right?

    Bill
     
  6. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

    It would be true if we used low light levels, so the plants demands were low enough for the natural processes to be sufficient. But, it won't be true for high light tanks.
     
  7. aquabillpers

    aquabillpers Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Should ADA aquasoil be replaced?

    My point was that both kinds of substrates will "wear out", as it were. Low light tanks can (supposedly) then get their nutrients solely from the natural processes. High light tanks will need dosing, but since they need dosing anyway, even when the substrates are new, it isn't much of a change.

    Bill
     
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