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short lasting yeast mixture

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by bary_g, Oct 19, 2008.

  1. bary_g

    bary_g Junior Poster

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    I’m having a problem with unstable DIY yeast mixture for hagen canister. I was trying several mixtures ( recently 2 tsp of soda, ½ tsp yeast, sugar) but they yeld CO2 for 4-5 days only. I’m getting 4 bubbles per second the first day and then it drops to zero in next few days. What can I do to produce more stable mixture?
    thanks for suggestions,
    Bartek
     
  2. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    Back when I was doing diy on my 30g here's what worked for me:

    1. 2 - 2L bottles, 2 c sugar and 1 tsp yeast in each one
    2. Keep a small desk lamp on them 24/7 to keep temps up enough to maintain production (temp needs to be at least 74 - 75 at all times)
    3. Weekly, completely change out one bottle, and add 1 tsp of bloomed yeast to the other one, next week alternate bottles

    Realistically you won't be able to go longer than a week without doing something.
     
  3. nerbaneth

    nerbaneth Guest

    is 4bps too much for you?

    if so, try increasing the amount of sugar or decreasing the amount of yeast. Another thing that I read somewhere was to add protein powder (preferably yeast based, but I use soy protein) From what I read the yeast cannot live anaerobically very long with just sugar.

    possibly try using a little less baking soda (I use about 1/2 tsp to 1/4) I'm not sure this will make a difference. Adding baking soda from what I have read is supposed to stabilize the pH so adding too much couldn't be too harmful.

    yeast is picky stuff, so you never know what will effect it. also, what strand of yeast are you using? the fast rising stuff is no good. just get plain old yeast.

    -Nerb
     
  4. Henry Hatch

    Henry Hatch Guru Class Expert

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    I had one other thought. If you are using a check valve that could be part of the problem. Many of the cheaper check valves sold can require a fair amount of pressure to operate. You might try removing the check valve and raising the co2 line above the tank to prevent back siphoning. In a diy co2 system as the mixture puts out less co2 it takes longer and longer to create enough pressure to work.

    I think Carissa is correct that most co2 mixtures are good for about a week.

    You need to experiment with your yeast mexture. Local water conditions vary. Generally more yeast means more co2 but the mixture will exhaust more quickly.
     
  5. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    I used to use a shut off valve instead of a check valve for that reason. IT would clog up with water and mess it all up. You don't need a check valve on the bottle if it's air tight, you only need to be able to shut it off BEFORE unscrewing it and don't forget to turn it back on. I eliminated a lot of trouble when I made that adaptation plus the heat source. Also check for leaks by blowing into the bottle and pressurizing it while it's underwater in a bucket. A small leak won't cause trouble when co2 is being produced rapidly, but as soon as it slacks it will start cauisng problems. My experience is that all co2 bottles spring leaks eventually. :) Especially if you use silicone to seal them. The best thing I found for that was actually Shoe Goop, it hardens into a very stiff seal and doesn't fail nearly as quickly as silicone.
     
  6. bary_g

    bary_g Junior Poster

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    Thank you all for help. I'm gonna try to change the proportions of the soda/yeast. However I'm thinking about getting pressurized CO2.
    Regards,
    Bartek
     
  7. thief

    thief Junior Poster

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    Good thread,

    I believe the problem in my room is temperature. It fluctuates between 64-74 F.

    But I cannot control heat in my room. Should I put the bottles in a container of some sort to help control heat more?

    What amount of sugar and yeast would be recommended in a 1/2 poland spring bottle?

    Thanks guys.
     
  8. nerbaneth

    nerbaneth Guest

    I'm not sure what a half poland spring bottle is. Does it say Fl Oz. anywhere on it? or gal /liter? - Your best bet is to use a 2 liter or an (expensive) old coke sryup container. The idea is that the vessel needs to be designed to take a lot of pressure. water bottles and other things of that sort are not designed to take the pressure (unless it had a carbonated beverage in it)

    -Nerb
     
  9. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    For heat just use a desk lamp (with an incandescent bulb). This will keep temps up. Some people use a bucket of water with a heater in it.
     
  10. Henry Hatch

    Henry Hatch Guru Class Expert

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    I keep my co2 in a 5 gallon tank of water with a heater. This helps keep output stable especially during winter. My approach is to use a single larger bottle and replace it weekly. Right now I use 3 liters of mixture per 20 gallons I do not rotate bottles. If you are rotating bottles of yeast mixture using bread yeast the oldest bottle will be 14 days old if you rotate weekly. If you are using bread yeast in my experience there will be little if any co2 being generated. I have never had bread yeast last more than 10 days at the outside.

    I think diy co2 works ok for tanks up to 30 gallons. I would suggest using low to moderate light.

    I use one cup of sugar and 1/2 tsp yeast for each 2 liters of water. Almost everyone I talk to use more sugar. I don't and I have no problems. I use wine yeast. More expensive, but much more stable co2 output. You may also want to use dechlorinated water.
     
  11. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    Bread yeast won't last longer than a week. But adding an additional tsp after the week is up, prevents the work of changing the entire bottle every single week. I used to add 2 c sugar per 2L water and it would take about two weeks to use it up (the sugar that is) - but a tsp of yeast had to be added half way to keep it going for that second week. I recommend 1.5 - 2L per 10 gallons tank size.
     
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