Sand/Gravel Foregrounds

Left C

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During the past few years, seeing sand and/or gravel foreground aquascapes have increased. Some of these are uncluttered and look really nice. In the lasted issue of TFH, Amano discusses this somewhat. On the next few pages of the link below is that article. What do you think about this 'not so new' trend? I know that part of this article is to promote ADA's cosmetic sand, but other than that, what do you think?

pages 52 to 57 inclusive are in Amano's spread, but the article ends on page 55: http://www.tfhdigital.com/tfh/201010?sub_id=Bm0EvWGyaDlX7#pg55
 
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Tom Barr

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Opens up the scape and area for fish, not so densely planted, easier to deal with horticulturally, obvious tie in with many Japanese style gardens(the entire concept of nature aquariums are a direct take off on the much older and formalized art of terrestrial gardening in Japan).
So to the fish keeper who is interested in plants, but does not wanna go whole hog, it's good, and for those who cannot manage foregrounds well, not bad either.

Resized350galafter.jpg


This tank is open but it is all the same sediment, why bother with tacky mixing and enriched sediment in the back?
There's few rooted plants in here and those that are, are tough and easy to grow.

Never been a big fan or two types of sediments, always ends up tacky and mixed for many hobbyists.
You also need to stir it often to keep the color nice and algae free.

Easier than foreground plants though, and a nice place for sand shifting species and diggers, feeding spot etc.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Left C

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That's really nice looking. I really like the needle leaf. I see a school of hatchet fish on the right side, but I can't tell what the other species is on the lower right.