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?'s about bacteria that eat dead algae, and NH4

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by Carissa, Sep 30, 2007.

  1. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    Is it true that when dead algae cells are consumed by bacteria, the bacteria releases an antibiotic that kills live algae cells?

    Also, since NH4+ is taken up by plants, what about when the pH is higher and there is a greater percentage of NH3 instead? Does this mean that there's a greater chance of getting rid of your ammonia faster if you keep the pH lower?
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Bacteria and fungi both can and do consume dead algae cells and cytoplasmuic contents.

    I have grave doubts about the bacteria releasing anything that in antibiotic:)
    Why kill yourself?

    Some bacteria can attack some algae, so can some fungi.
    Question is, does this play a role in our tanks or in natural systems with plants?

    No, not really.

    Inverts(mostly microscopic) are larger role players here and that's mainly phytoplankton, not epiphytic algae.

    As far as NH4/NH3....plants use only NH4 and can convert it, they have plenty of H+'s floating around to use for transport.

    But in general, the plants will do better at lower pH's than at higher ones for uptake of some nutrients, however, for Carbon, there's more around in natural systems in harder higher pH water........and Carbon is generally the most limiting thing to submersed plants.

    I'd worry more about CO2 than pH.


    Regards,
    Tom Barr

    regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  3. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    Here is where I was reading about it:

    GREEN WATER:

    "When algae dies and is subjected to aerobic bacterial decomposition by heterotroph bacteria, a by-product of this process is a substance, released into the water, that is toxic to the living algae."
     
  4. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    On the subject of carbon, what exactly is it in Flourish Excel that takes the place of co2, and why is this not available in other formulations (maybe a patent?)?
     
  5. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    That is a very long article, and it is largely the opinions of the author. I doubt that this particular opinion is correct. I have never read that theory before, and I have never seen, nor heard of any experiences that support it.
     
  6. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    It isn't that Excel has something to take the place of CO2, it is a chemical substance that plants can use for carbon. It is a substance made from polymerized glutaraldehyde - Glutaraldehyde - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A few people have tried dosing just glutaraldehyde in place of Excel and it apparently works, but it is also pretty toxic, so it shouldn't be played with unless you know exactly what you are doing.
     
  7. phanmc

    phanmc Lifetime Charter Member
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    The active ingredient in excel is polycycloglutaracetal, which is patented by Seachem. Polycycloglutaracetal is derived from glutaraldehyde, which is toxic and commonly used to sterilize medical equipment. According to Seachem, polycycloglutaracetal's molecular makeup contains a 5 carbon chain (glutaraldehyde is C5H8O2) which is accessible to plants.
     
  8. Carissa

    Carissa Guru Class Expert

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    Very interesting. Thanks for the info.
     
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