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Rotalla Willichii and Rotala Magenta

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by shane, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. shane

    shane Lifetime Charter Member
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    Any reason to think 2x38W of T5HO lighting won't grow r.willichii and r.magneta well in a 36x20x18 tank?

    I have seen people say these plants need tons of light to grow successfully.
     
  2. Tug

    Tug Lifetime Charter Member
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    Two 38W of T5HO lighting 20" above the substrate is "tons" of light.

    Aquatic plants that are said to need high levels of light are more likely CO2 limited, not light deficient. :cool:
     
    #2 Tug, Dec 12, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 12, 2010
  3. shane

    shane Lifetime Charter Member
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    The bulbs are about 10" above the surface of the water. I have another 38w bulb that I don't use. Any reason I should turn it on? Maybe for a couple hours a day?
     
  4. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Some of the nicest of both I saw at 2w/gal of NO T12's........

    So no, you have plenty of light.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  5. shane

    shane Lifetime Charter Member
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    Does anything special have to be done to get nice pink rotala wallichii?
     
  6. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    CO2, CO2 and CO2......I'd suggest using the gieseman mid and aquaflora mix.
    That should give nice colors.'

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  7. shane

    shane Lifetime Charter Member
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    I am currently using the midday and aquaflora. Only have had the r.wallichii in the tank for about 1 week. Will see what happens.
     
  8. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Patience and good CO2 will cure all that ails thee.
    You need to wait for nice new growth to start.
    Once it starts to grow well, it's quite fast and weedy, might take awhikle to get to that point, but it does happen.


    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  9. Fuzz

    Fuzz Junior Poster

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    I realize that this is an old thread, but I'm trying to grow R. Wallichii as well. I bought it from the internet and looked great when I received it. The old stuff turned brown and crappy, but I've definitely got new growth. I just recently chopped off all the old/brown stuff and threw it out. I kept the tops and planted each about an inch apart so they get good light.

    I'm dosing Potassium Nitrate, Potassium Sulfate, Magnesium Sulfate, and Plantex CSM+B pretty heavily and I've got Co2 to the point just below where my fish start gasping for air. I've got 2x T5HO bulbs like posted above and my bulbs are about 16" above the substrate(both bulbs are 6,700k). I got high lighting because I read about needing high light...But now I'm reading that all plants will grow under lower light as long as you dose everything else just as well(co2 and ferts). If that's the case, maybe I should put the actinic bulb back in to show some better coloration in my fish??

    The tops of the new growth is pink, stems are green, and the leaves/needles are a darker color like orange or red(hard to tell because they're so small).

    Should I be dosing something different? Should I turn the lights down a bit like mentioned previously in this thread? Any help with this plant would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Fuzz
     
  10. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    actinic bulbs are not used with freshwater planted tanks. I would not use that bulb, Fuzz.
     
  11. Fuzz

    Fuzz Junior Poster

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    I know that the actinic bulbs don't do anything for plants. that's the whole idea. I'd have one 6,700k T5HO about 16" away from the substrate. That alone is in the high range. If I put a "useless" actinic bulb in to make the color of my fish stand out, then I won't just have an empty space in my fixture. So basically the actinic bulb would be purely for aesthetics.

    The problem that I might be facing currently is that I have "too much" light. 108w of HO light is in the 200 PAR range(WAY above very high light). One bulb is enough...Why not have a decorative/accent light to make my tank look better? Does actinic lighting have negative effects on freshwater fish/plants? I don't think so.

    Resources : http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/lighting/105774-par-vs-distance-t5-t12-pc.html
    (PAR chart, table with bulb heights and various bulbs, and a brief discussion on reflectors)
     
  12. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    Why not add a disco ball, too?

    I guess if you like the look, many don't...

    I still doubt that they are completely useless and if plants can't use them I would bet algae can find a way to use the wavelength.

    Since we are throwing around forum links, here is one to the counter of your argument: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/lighting/116202-actinic-light-fresh-water-tank.html Actinic bulbs were also not involved with the measurements in Hoppy's graphs, so I'm not sure how it is applicable to the actinic question.

    If you have already made up your mind, why are you looking for advice? Or was the post rhetorical like many of the questions in your reply?

    The thread pretty much answered your questions...if your light is way too high then you most likely have CO2 deficiencies. You will encounter that before you run into nutrient problems. Reduce the light, lose the actinic (IMHO), and figure out the CO2. Its been said by many that most people rule out CO2 and assume they have it right..if your light is too high you may not be able to provide enough without gassing fish. If you have O2 problems fish will gasp at lower CO2 levels, as well.

    "Any help with this plant would be greatly appreciated." Your snappy response would say otherwise.
     
  13. Fuzz

    Fuzz Junior Poster

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    I didn't mean to sound snappy. I'm sorry. I guess I could always try my fixture with just one bulb...

    Thanks for your input and I apologize for the misunderstanding
     
  14. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    No worries, things often get lost over the internet. Lighting is the easiest variable to control, if you dose EI method, then you are supplying ample nutrients, so that leaves CO2. The bigger the tank the more difficult it is to distribute CO2.
     
  15. Fuzz

    Fuzz Junior Poster

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    I'm dosing a macro/micro mix that was already mixed, so I'm gonna need to buy all the ferts separately when i need more. There's a chemical reaction that screws up iron? hmmm. maybe that's why my cabomba purple doesn't really get the reddish tones? I dunno...

    I don't have carbon in my filter, co2 is good(lime green/yellow on the drop checker), and light should be good according to the PAR chart. The rotala wallichii is growing, so I guess I should stop worrying about it and wait for it to get bigger
     
  16. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    A drop checker is not a reliable method to measure CO2, it colors are subjective and its response time is slow. It can help you reach a good start point, but will not give you a fine tuned measurement.
     
  17. Jwad7215

    Jwad7215 Junior Poster

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    What is a good way to measure co2?
     
  18. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    Nothing cheap or easy unfortunately. Experience by observing growth and fish or some expensive equipment. Tom has developed a method using a CO2 probe that he says is fairly good.

    I'm not sure what he uses as a membrane around the probe or exactly how he does it...
     
  19. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Someone Call, Cheap & Easy...

    Hi,

    Watch your plants.

    Biollante
     
  20. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Lifetime Members
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    Semantics

    Is good growth or bad growth a measurement? ;)

    I mentioned observation...cheap, but getting it right isn't easy
     
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