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Question For People With Ada Amazonia

Discussion in 'Sediment / Substrate' started by mexicatz, Jan 3, 2018.

  1. mexicatz

    mexicatz Junior Poster

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    I'm starting a new 20 gallon long that will have a patch of amazonia where I plan to plant. Probably an area of about 8x8.

    I've cycled a sponge in my other filter for about a month and have a sponge prefilter I can squeeze into the tank.

    My question is, if I plan on light-moderate planting should I plant at the start or wait out the ammonia spike to avoid algae on the plants?
     
  2. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    For me I would just do the water changes man. I mean in this first month or so this is when plants really take a boom. Plus you learn more algae management. The first month or so is really the maker or breaker. Untill the soil depletes or you need to recompensate too will make or break but that's well down the line.
     
  3. mexicatz

    mexicatz Junior Poster

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    Kind of old but im going to be planting with several different crypts throughout the entire tank about 50$ worth. I'm going to do the water change method recommended by ADA for the amazonia, ( daily for first week, every other day second week, etc.). Would this be a terrible environment for crypts because they're sensitive to parameter changes? Not sure if they will continually melt
     
  4. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    Your going to need the water changes to combat the nh4 leech, those will really melt your crypts off. As far as sensitivity, i'd say use the same water in water changing, that is all i can advise. Right now i am growing bullosa, nurii, green gecko, and some other name i forgot. Green gecko took a hit right away but recovered fast, This was probably because it was in too much flow though, a big leaf melted off.
     
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  5. mexicatz

    mexicatz Junior Poster

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    If I didn't plant initially would it just take slightly longer to cycle and I would lose some growth that I could of gained from the ammonia?
     
  6. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    I would do it that way, depending if these are rare /rarer crypts or not. I wouldn't worry about the initial burst of growth because they're gonna grow anyways. Plants take a lot of patience, if time is not on your side, then do the water change way. What crypts are you investing in?
     
  7. mexicatz

    mexicatz Junior Poster

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    just regular crypt parva, wendtii, petchii. Problem is I need a lot and don't really have enough money to buy them all again
     
  8. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    Oooo those are the easy ones. Just make sure your tank is filled or use a lot less light, plus co2
     
  9. mexicatz

    mexicatz Junior Poster

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    so I should probably plant with these at the start or will there be melting beyond the initial melt with frequent water changes
     
  10. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    If you go the "ada" way of water changes, then you probably won't get melt at all.
     
  11. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    Why not use an ammonia test kit, and check the ammonia level every day. If it gets above about 1-2 ppm, do a 50% water change that day. If it doesn't get that high don't bother changing any water. I did that with one of my new starts, and it worked fine as far as I could tell. I didn't do any water changes during the cycling. Plants do eat up a lot of ammonia as a nitrogen source, and a very easy to use source from the plant's perspective.
     
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  12. mexicatz

    mexicatz Junior Poster

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    Might try that, but my test kit is a little low. Any opinions on planting from the start if only using crypts,anubias, and marsilea? If it would cause more issue than its worth
     
  13. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Member

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    I always plant heavily from the get go, I think it brings with it many benefits, for one the bacteria introduced along with plants does a good job of inoculating the tank and probably helps cycle the filter. Plants are also efficient water purifiers and help maintain water quality.
    I've never really had any problems, other than maybe once when I had a temporary diatomaceous algae bloom which soon disappeared once the tank matured. I think the key to avoiding any potential problems is to plant as heavily as possible straight away. A dense plant biomass infers a great deal of biological stability.
    With crypts you will probably get some melt no matter what you do, it's just the way they adapt to your tanks unique water conditions. You can limit it by dialling your CO2 in asap, removing affected leaves and staying on top of water changes and housekeeping reducing dissolved and solid organics.
     
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  14. Allwissend

    Allwissend Article Editor
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    I will also say do the recommended water changes.

    The crypts you listed are easy and spread rapidly. A 20g will be covered in no time so you do not need to get a lot of them. Some crypts will melt regardless of the levels of NH4 so there is no guarantee.

    If possible try to keep the pH low, below 7 to reduce the formation of NH3, which I suspect is more damaging to plants.

    You may also want to put some fast growing easy stems at the start to help with increased plant biomass.
     
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