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Problems with holes in my Sword plants leaves

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by EmilioSr, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. EmilioSr

    EmilioSr Junior Poster

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    Hi,

    I have a 14 Gal Bio Cube, lots of light. I have 2 Clown Loaches, one Clown Pleco,
    4 black Neons, 3 dawn tetras and 2 Corys. I recently re-cleaned and setup my tank.
    Planted with 3 Echinodorus "Pink Leafed" [dont know what species] , 6 Corkscrew vals and three clumps of Laelionopsis brasiliensis [sp?] or what dealers call MicroSwords.

    Waited for the cycling, placed fish and the Echinodorus were growing putting out lots of new leafs. Vals doing OK, lots of really screwed up leaves.

    The swords are getting holes in both new and old leafs.

    I use Flourish Excel and the Flourish organic nutrient, one carbon the other whatever
    nutrients it has micro or not.

    What causes the holes? The Botias? The pleco? Lack of nutrients?

    I feed the Pleco a slice of Zucchini, every other night, weighted with Stainless Bolt [small] on apiece of monofilament. Really chews it up. Dont know if it is the Pleco or the Botia or both. I have seen the Botia munching on the Zuchhini and on the roots of the brasiliensis.

    I have never had this problem before, on any tank!!!

    What could be causing the holes on the leaves of the Ehinodorus spp.??
     
  2. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Sorry

    Could be any of your choices.

    The clown Loaches need serious space, like at least 75 gallons, 100 gallons would be better.

    Depending on which kind of Pleco the tank is most likely too small .

    Unless those Cory's are pygmy s, they are borderline for a 14 gallon tank.

    I just don't see how you are going to be successful.

    Sorry I cannot be of assistance.:(

    Biollante
     
  3. EmilioSr

    EmilioSr Junior Poster

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    Sword plants with holes

    BIOLLANTE ANSWERED;

    Could be any of your choices. WHICH CHOICES, WHICH ONE

    The clown Loaches need serious space, like at least 75 gallons, 100 gallons would be better. THE BOTIAS ARE 1" LONG.

    Depending on which kind of Pleco the tank is most likely too small . IT IS A CLOWN PLECO 2" LONG, THEY DONT GET TOO BIG.

    Unless those Cory's are pygmy s, they are borderline for a 14 gallon tank. THE CORY'S ARE 1" DINKYS.

    I just don't see how you are going to be successful. SUCCESS DEPENDS ON YOUR GOALS. MY GOAL IS TO GET AN ANSWER AND SOLUTION TO "HOLES ON THE LEAVES'!

    Sorry I cannot be of assistance. THANKS FOR TRYING!!!

    EmilioSr
     
  4. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    My Humble Apology

    Hi Emilio,

    My apologies for tone, my first inclination was to stay away from your post, I should have heeded my instincts.:eek:

    Fourteen gallons of water limits our choices.

    Clown Loaches, Chromobotia macracanthus can grow upwards of 16 inches (41 cm). They are raucus, fun to watch but the 75 gallon recommended minimum, is a minimum, I stand by my recommendation of 100 or better yet 125 gallon tank, they should also be kept in groups of five or more, they have a highly developed social structure. They can damage plants. This site Clown Loach (Chromobotia macracanthus) — Loaches Online gives some information.

    Clown Plecos, Panaque maccus, grow to 3.5 inches (9 cm) may not be a bad choice with heavily planted tank conditions. They need a more varied diet as well as wood to chew on World Cichlids Fish Profile The Clown Pleco, and Clown Plecostomus | Peckoltia pulcher should be helpful.

    Depending on the Cory, they could work, but it is just too small for the larger Cory’s. I will also admit a bias where Cory’s are concerned; I tend to think they should be kept in groups of six, eight or more.

    The holes could be a number of sources; my first guess would be nutrient, if you can give a little more description of your dosing. The Clown Loaches makes it difficult for me to make any judgments, since the problem could be the fish.

    I am not trying to be contentious, others may well have simple easy solution.

    I am sorry, I just don’t see how this set up can be successful.:confused:

    Biollante
     
  5. EmilioSr

    EmilioSr Junior Poster

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    Hi Bio,

    This tank is very temporary, it is being switched to Neolamprologus multifasciatus [Shell Dwellers], wild caught, or so the owner states, six of them so I can get a good male/female ratio, hopefully two mating pairs, probably just one though. Maybe a couple of Sagittaria, if any, plants, due to hi Ph. Just a few "Escargot" shells for the colony to establish hidey holes and breed breed breed. They are quite prolific.
    I may put a couple of "dither" fish to entertain/excite the Multis; endlers or a couple of non fancy guppies.

    Anyway my main concern was the holes in the Swords, I have never had that happen before in any of my tanks. One thing I forgot to mention the Ph is fairly low at 6.5 to 6.2. Swords are supposed to like this I presume, if not I can buffer it up.
     
  6. ceg4048

    ceg4048 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Hi,
    Assuming that the holes are not being caused by animals then the only other possibility is poor CO2. Any structural disintegration, translucency, holes, browning are cause by loss of carbon - because structure is primarily made of carbon.

    This may not have happened to you before because you may not have had as much light or you may have had a carbon deficiency before.

    Cheers,
     
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