Plant Plan Of Dutch Aquarium

Toni Grappa

New Member
Apr 28, 2020
3
1
3
59
Germany
Hello everyone,

I am currently working on the installation of Dutch aquariums or in a first step "only" on the planning of such a tank. I bought some (few) books on the subject, but what really impressed (and intimidated) me is the article by Pikez in this forum.

The topic is quite complex and I tried to get a feeling for how such a tank can or must be built, because what wants to be a "real Dutch aquarium" must follow some rules. First there is the third rule or alternatively the golden section for the construction. One plant should be used per 10 cm aquarium length. My tank is 100 cm long, so make 10 plants or 10 plant groups, because no plant should be used twice. Then there are the eye-catching points (front or back right and left) at the intersections of the baselines. I decided to use 2, because more points do not make sense in the small basin. The last point is the famous "Leidener street", which is typical for this kind of aquarium and is used in most tanks. It usually forms a half S-shape and the uppermost point should be hidden behind another plant. When we talk about a street, we mean an avenue or a canal lined with trees.

At first I understand the task purely graphically or as a 3D puzzle. My playground is an open source 3D program (Blender).
I have created a plant plan. But it remains "work in progress" until I start with the concrete implementation. Ideally, things will go the way I want them to, but whether my wish will come true, is uncertain. That's why there are (probably) changes in the running tank for the composition of the plant groups. The only difference is: a 3d plan can be changed quickly, changes in the tank are more complex.

I am aware, that the construction of a Dutch aquarium should be reserved for experienced aquarists (which I am not). But I live on the border with Holland and Dutch flowers and dutch culture are very present in our region. Therefore it is obvious for me to deal with this topic, even if it may seem a bit "megalomaniac".
p.s. Sorry for my bad english.

Plant_plan_dutch1.png
 
Last edited:

Stigigemla

New Member
Jan 30, 2022
22
3
3
Gemla Sweden
The classic dutch planted aquarium does not follow the rules You see today in the net.
They many times used terrasses for plants and roots + stones as decorative elements.
It is still possible to find the old Dutch planted aquarium bible on the net: Arend Von Den Nieuwenhuizen, Das wunder im wohnzimmer.
There You have pictures and planting description of many of the Dutch masters from the seventies. The book is in German.

On tropicas homepage: https://tropica.com/en/inspiration/ You have 122 planting plans. Some are near the dutch style.
 
Last edited:

rajkm

Article Editor
Staff member
Lifetime Member
Article Editor
Sep 16, 2015
693
221
43
Hillsboro, OR
Hello everyone,

I am currently working on the installation of Dutch aquariums or in a first step "only" on the planning of such a tank. I bought some (few) books on the subject, but what really impressed (and intimidated) me is the article by Pikez in this forum.

The topic is quite complex and I tried to get a feeling for how such a tank can or must be built, because what wants to be a "real Dutch aquarium" must follow some rules. First there is the third rule or alternatively the golden section for the construction. One plant should be used per 10 cm aquarium length. My tank is 100 cm long, so make 10 plants or 10 plant groups, because no plant should be used twice. Then there are the eye-catching points (front or back right and left) at the intersections of the baselines. I decided to use 2, because more points do not make sense in the small basin. The last point is the famous "Leidener street", which is typical for this kind of aquarium and is used in most tanks. It usually forms a half S-shape and the uppermost point should be hidden behind another plant. When we talk about a street, we mean an avenue or a canal lined with trees.

At first I understand the task purely graphically or as a 3D puzzle. My playground is an open source 3D program (Blender).
I have created a plant plan. But it remains "work in progress" until I start with the concrete implementation. Ideally, things will go the way I want them to, but whether my wish will come true, is uncertain. That's why there are (probably) changes in the running tank for the composition of the plant groups. The only difference is: a 3d plan can be changed quickly, changes in the tank are more complex.

I am aware, that the construction of a Dutch aquarium should be reserved for experienced aquarists (which I am not). But I live on the border with Holland and Dutch flowers and dutch culture are very present in our region. Therefore it is obvious for me to deal with this topic, even if it may seem a bit "megalomaniac".
p.s. Sorry for my bad english.

View attachment 15929
I think you are on the right track.
I have done 3 tanks trying to follow Pikez guide. One thing challenging with smaller tanks is creating depth and plant selection.

10 group of plants in your case is correct. And I like the grouping you are planning. I see that you are thinking of a sloping substrate too, which may become issue in long term, and if you don’t go with sloping substrate, downoi may look flatter unless you can grow it tall.

One of the comments I had received from judges was about empty walls, so I have been doing moss walls or Buce walls. Basically you don’t want your background looking open.