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PAR readings in some of the latest LED Fixtures in the market

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by Nuno M., Nov 15, 2016.

  1. Nuno M.

    Nuno M. Member

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    I there everyone I think this is very pretty helpful info for all of us, me and a friend got our hands on a PAR meter and taken the time to test some of the latest brands in the market.


    Hope you guys like the results we will share


    Tested some 'regular' led lamps. The cheap that i can find...


    Normal E27 . 10W . 6500K . 806lm . CRI: >=80Ra . Power factor: >0.5


    [FOREVER-LIGHT] rated as class A+



    priced around 2.5€


    cm PAR


    10 500


    20 127


    30 57.5


    40 32.5


    50 20.9


    notes


    -produces a lot of heat, good surface for dissipation is recommended


    -4000ºK have lower PAR value (as expected), maybe good for mixing if you like warmer colors


    - be very careful, it's a 230v lamp, even after the driver the voltage rate is high!


    Flood LED . 10W . 6000K . 800lm . CRI: >70Ra . Power factor: >0.5


    [FOREVER-LIGHT] rated as class A



    priced around 8€


    cm PAR


    10 268


    20 70.2


    30 30.6


    40 17.6


    50 11.6


    notes


    -very low heat, very safe to use 'near' water, led uses 12V current


    -easy to install, no need extra dissipation surface


    - easy to divide the 230V driver for safer place


    GU10 . 6W . 6000K . 556lm . CRI: >=80Ra . Power factor: >0.54 . Beam 38º


    [LED POL - ORO] - ORO-GU10-6W-OPTO-BZ
    rated as class A+


    cm PAR(without lens) PAR (with lens)


    10 370 1880


    20 93,5 495


    30 40,2 208


    40 24 106


    50 15 62


    notes


    -produces a lot of heat, good surface for dissipation is recommended


    -4000ºK have lower PAR value (as expected), maybe good for mixing if you like warmer colors


    -be very careful, it's a 230v lamp, even after the driver the voltage rate is high!


    -version with lens is more expensive but can be installed at higher distance...


    IKEA LED JANSJÖ . 88 lumen . 2W . 3000ºK . 9.99€


    cm PAR


    10 155


    20 44,5


    30 19,5


    40 10,9


    50 7,5


    notes


    -very safe, seen used in wabi's, just for fun!


    -no need to make fixture, is buy and install! You can even choose the color!


    Beamswork HiLumen . Planted Version . 6500ºK . 33W . 90cm [updated]


    cm PAR


    10 158


    20 80,6


    30 49


    40 34


    50 25


    notes


    -this is a true aquarium fixture, i've used with good results


    -the uniformity along the fixture is very good and consistent


    -very low heat, large surface for dissipation


    -uses 12v after the driver, very safe


    Chihiros Serie A 120cm . 65W . 8000ºK


    cm PAR


    10 286


    20 142


    30 91,2


    40 64,3


    50 47,8


    2xChihiros Serie A 120cm . 65W . 8000ºK


    now with water . 120x50x50 tank . 6,5cm fixture high + 2cm water level = 8,5 cm LED to water



    cm PAR PAR (with apogee converter factors**)


    10 265 213


    20 192 140


    30 152 106


    40 132 110


    48 122 82


    All measures took in darkness, open space to avoid reflections, open air (no water).


    Always took reading in the axis of light (the best value).


    Sensor used was Apogee SQ-120* without the LED correction factor (direct measures).


    * Apogee Underwater factor correction 1.08


    ** Using 'Underwater-PAR-Calculator' made by apogee.


    *** Correction factor for LED (when compared with T5) CW -4,2% ; NW -6,1%; WW -9,9% (not applied to this test)
     
  2. Nuno M.

    Nuno M. Member

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    More light to the lights...


    Me and Tiago grabbed the stuff and went testing a few more.


    Some extra considerations can be added in the future, design, built quality, led's quality, extra features, etc.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Special tanks to Luís ALves from ECOARIUM PORTUGAL for the time and patience!


    enjoy,
     
  3. Nuno M.

    Nuno M. Member

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    By curiosity we took reading along a LUX meter, the 47 factor is constant.


    If you have a LUXmeter divide by 47 the value and you have the PAR value (very near).


    One possible table to convert LUX in PAR values (use with some caution)...


    [img2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"custom","src":"https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5720/30456927401_64ed6b2ee4_b.jpg[/img]


    cheers
     
  4. Nuno M.

    Nuno M. Member

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  5. Nuno M.

    Nuno M. Member

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    2 people like this.
  6. fablau

    fablau rotalabutterfly.com
    Staff Member Moderator

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  7. Nuno M.

    Nuno M. Member

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    Glad being of help and contributing for this calculator with some values ;)
     
  8. Jason King

    Jason King barrreport.com
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Thank you Nuno :)
     
  9. Seattle_Aquarist

    Seattle_Aquarist Guru Class Expert

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    Hi Nuno,


    I appreciate your posts. It looks like you are using an older Apogee SQ series sensor with a digital voltmeter for your readings. The older SQ series sensor was developed prior to the popularity of LED and will give an inaccurate PAR reading when used with LED's, typically providing readings higher than the actual PAR reading. The Apogee SQ-500 sensor is a 'full spectrum' sensor developed to address the shortcomings of the older models when taking output readings of LED fixtures.


    GSAS recently upgraded our MQ-210 meter to the MQ-510 meter. The upgrade included the new sensor as well as an upgrade to the meter software . The MQ-210 and the MQ-510 meters as well as the SQ-520 sensor are specifically designed to take readings with the sensor underwater and have the immersion effect correction factor pre-programed in the firmware or sensor software allowing the user to make excellent underwater measurements right out of the box.


    The readings that are being taken with the set-up pictured are fine for comparison purposes, but unfortunately the PAR readings are not representative the actual PAR readings we would experience in our aquariums.
     
  10. tmiravent

    tmiravent Junior Poster

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    Hello,


    thanks for your reply.


    Yes, we've used the old sensor with a calibrated multimeter .


    According Apogee you can use it with the correction factors.


    If you watch carefully that series (SQ500) has higher sensitivity in the red's and less in the blues (when compared with the original sensor).


    Apogee launched also a reading corrector (for underwater correction) for the other, that we applied in some cases.


    The readings with both sensor's should be very similar (if this procedure and corrections is followed).


    We don't have the objective to make the reading's like a lab, just to give an very close idea of the power of this fixtures.


    We know that some readings were not made in 'ideal' situations, but we 'try' write the conditions of the reading.


    The test that we thought of was to put the fixtures in the worst conditions: in a dark place with no reflections (at least that would not change with readings).


    You easily see that a tank with water increases the PAR readings, as expected.


    You can check Nuno's tank, that we measured with water and correction factors. Also values for the fixtures outside water.


    The layout (wood and stones) can have a huge impact in the PAR values also!


    Other factors are very important in fixtures, construction, light distribution...


    I' ll try to make more comments along in readings that we made.


    Returning to the Apogee sensor and a specific reading, the ADA RGB:


    - We didn't measure the values that were expected (announced) and i doubt that they are not correct.


    We took LUX values along (side by side) with the PAR meter and were very consistent the correction factor. The exception was this ADA!


    My guess is that some part of light is outside the visible range (for the blues/UV range), but this is guessing, i have to measure it!


    Thanks for your sharp point's in our test,


    cheers,


    Tiago
     
  11. gabcas0319

    gabcas0319 Junior Poster

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    amazing info! thanks!
     
  12. Uslanja

    Uslanja Subscriber

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    Hi Nuno! I know this post is almost a year old. I followed a link to your Flickr page. You have a very nice tank! Your photography is very good!
     
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