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organic vs. inorganic N

Discussion in 'Advanced Strategies and Fertilization' started by deep blue, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. deep blue

    deep blue Junior Poster

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    Can you please explain main diffrences beatvine organic and inorganic NO3 or please
    put link to old post. I know you have explain thet before but I can not find it any more.

    Thanks,Branislav
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Likely better to say:

    Inorganic N forms: N2 gas, NH4+, NO3-, NO2- etc
    Organic forms: Glutamine, Glycine, enzymes etc

    This may help put it more into prespective:

    http://www.norganics.com/nitrogen.pdf

    However, realize that we add plenty of Carbon from CO2 that's fixed into active growing plant tissue.

    Reduced carbon.........

    That's fine if the plant tissue is healthy and growing well.
    But bad if not, as bacteria will consume the tissue and give off lots of CO2 in the process as well as cellular contents that also leak out into the water.

    Total nitrogen - Plant Management in Florida Waters

    When plant tissue dies, it leaches and decays various forms of N.
    This is dependent on the species, the temperature, O2, concentration of decaying material and it's ratio of C:N.

    While a tank might be fine, if the plants suddenly stopped growing an decayed some, this would change the O2 and alter the system radically.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  3. deep blue

    deep blue Junior Poster

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    Tom I was thinking on your post where you explain thet NO3 from fish waste plants can't use and algea can and thet from KNO3 plants can use N much better and why.Sorry for bad explanation what is interesting me.

    Thanks,Branislav
     
  4. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    Fish waste contains a lot of ammonia, not nitrate, and I think that was what Tom was discussing. Plants use both. Algae use the ammonia as a signal that conditions are good for growing, so the spores start "hatching".
     
  5. deep blue

    deep blue Junior Poster

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    Thank you both,I can't find article any more,it was the long but good one and I did not bookmark him...next time.....
     
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