OK, .. How do YOU plant stems in a dry start?

Philosophos

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Any plant can do well under low light IME, and most take on denser, more pleasing growth forms. Cooler water is usually better too, but I'm not about to sacrifice apisto spawns for it.

The difference would probably be the fact that I'm working from established plants with nice big emersed root structures grown right into the aquasoil vs. coming in from a cutting and having to build a root structure over months. There isn't much blocking their light either, and that makes a big difference.

I'd have cranked the CO2 if it were an option, but the fauna was in from day 1. I had to pull very regular WC's to keep NH4 down; for whatever reason the aquasoil didn't completely cycle over 6 months of DSM.

Anyhow, my advise to everyone would be to avoid DSM glosso unless you can keep the temp stable. Glosso is very sensitive to the cold; more so than anything I've kept emersed so far. When emersed, glosso also lets off horrible amounts of some compound or other that sets the whole works off melting if even a small patch dies. It's almost like the rapid tissue necrosis that happens with corals, only it takes about 24-48 hours.
 

jonny_ftm

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Mar 5, 2009
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Probably mold the necrosis you talk about, it spreads really quickly.

Yes, my tank is much colder, no heater, so maybe it helps keeping the glosso slower in growth. Also the light is surely lower as you noted. Also, CO2 in that tank is really effiecient. The Atomizer does an impressive work there.

Interesting to know that it can grow so quickly (and ugly). Hope you get it sorted soon.
 

Philosophos

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I didn't see a bit of mold. The tissue simply turned brown and died. Diana Walstad was saying something about a hormone when it happened to her; it wouldn't be a big surprise given that certain compounds can cause fruit to ripen very rapidly.

How has the atomizer been working for you? Is it one of the in-line sorts?
 

jonny_ftm

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Mar 5, 2009
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Completely inline, very small and incredibely effiecient in my 12gal. It's teh first time I see Anubia pearling. After 5 months now of immersion, I never saw decaying leaves like I'm used to. You know, in nature plants have their leaves green for months. In our aquariums, often we need to trim too often and lower leaves decay in few weeks. Eleocharis was never trimmed, it is a jungle in density, but no decaying, only one yellow leave from time to time that floates and is quickely eaten by snails/algae. Also, it is the first time I have anubia healthy as if they were grown emersed: just no algae trace, no green spot, nothing. I believe CO2 plays a big role here. The mist is very fine and unseen esthetically at 30-40bpm. Also, the 185gph pump for a 12gal (6gal real volume) tank could help. Hard to get same flow in a bigger tank without using many pumps.

I have a spare 16-22 Atomizer that I'll make the jump and finally plug in my 60gal in lieu of the AM1000. I will monitor bubble count with same device and won't change anything else. This should be done in next few weeks and I'll let you know if it is as effiecient in a bigger tank than my 12gal. I really hope to get rid of the AM1000 while sparing some CO2
 
C

csmith

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So when you use this method with DSMing stems, apparently just laying them on the substrate and letting them do their thing, are the leaves removed? Is it really just laying them on the substrate or am I oversimplifying?
 

pat w

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Night of the Living Thread ...

I know it sounds too simple but that's all I did. Lay them on the substrate, don't remove the leaves, add a little presure to insure the segment joints are in contact. Then mist regularly to keep the root runners moist until they make their way to the water table you create. Use the natural distance between the segment joints to guage the distance between the stem runs, staggering the placement of the joints. This will establish a natural spacing, kind of takes the guess work out it.

One note though, if you can wait till the ground cover is well on its way you can save yourself a lot of extra work. Once they established for me they took off like rockets. Each joint sending a new shoot straight for the light. I had to do a lot of trimming to keep things in check. In retrospect I'd have waited till the ground cover was almost done before laying them out and just wait for the stems to tell me when to flood.

Let me know if you try and how it works for you.

Pat