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O2 readings from multiple tanks

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by Tom Barr, Nov 29, 2010.

  1. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    I took freshly calibrated LDO meters to task and ran then for a few days on several different tanks of mine.

    We can use absolute ppm or mg/l or better yet, % saturation relative of temp.

    The 180 Gal had about 80% at night, and went up to 110-120% during the midday later day.

    The 120 gal now non CO2 had as expected, 100% and has a wet/dry.

    The 60 Rift is now a wet/dry, it is 100%.

    The 60 Cube Bass tetra tank is about 95-100% at night, and 120-130% during the midday and latter day. It also has a wet/dry.

    The wet/drys seem to ensure higher O2 over the entire 24 hour span.
    So whether you use CO2 or not, they are a wise idea.

    The total difference between the nigth/day O2 levels was greatest with the CO2 enriched canister filter tank, as well as having the lowest O2 levels.

    ADA/Amano seem to only give a single reading for O2, I'm not sure when those readings are taken or if they measure the min/max for the 24 hour period, graph the ranges out etc.........but that is far more explanatory than a mere one time dataum point. The data given there was far too uniform to be trusted. And even on a single tank, such uniformity would suspicious indeed.

    Perhaps poor test methods/test.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  2. Infulgeo

    Infulgeo Prolific Poster

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    So do you feel a wet dry filter in general is a more efficient filter for a non c02 system given the parameters? i am currently debating between a canister and a wet dry so i'm glad to see the wet dry is effective
    thanks for the info,
    -Nick
     
  3. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    They are better for both systems with or without CO2 and as far light use and energy consumption, they provide better flow since there's no back pressure.
    Cleaning is easier, less hassle, no water level tank changes etc etc.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  4. Infulgeo

    Infulgeo Prolific Poster

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    Thanks for the reply i'll keep this in mind when choosing my filtration system :)
     
  5. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    I just wanted to do a decent reasonable, but not really exhaustive test to see differences.
    To my knowledge, no aquarist have really ever done this with planted tanks.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  6. Infulgeo

    Infulgeo Prolific Poster

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    Yes after scouriung numerous forums (and i mean numerous) i couldn't find any indication that, other than a few testimonial observations, people had done any sort of analysis...my only question is that with a wet dry would the lessened co2 make it difficult to grow plants or just that they would grow slower if proper nutrients are present? Because the trade off of slower plant growth for stability would be worth it imo.
     
    #6 Infulgeo, Dec 3, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 3, 2010
  7. Gerryd

    Gerryd Plant Guru Team
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    thread hijack

    Nick,

    If injecting c02 you just add more to compensate and add extra 02 at the same time for the health of the fish/critters.

    If not using c02, then yes, the wet/dry will have more of an impact IMO.

    However, with LOWER levels of light, the need for c02 is greatly reduced. Plus, many plants like crypts can get by with very little. I have heard Claus speak of crypts at great depths where there is very little light, but also less competition.

    I have great steady bolbitus growth with no c02 and a wet/dry with a lot of surface current, as I had lots of fish in there. All was well and was very healthy tank. I am going to do this again, now I am thinking about it lol

    So, try and get species that fit the conditons of your tank, this will be easier if at all possible.

    *******end of hijack

    Now back to our regularly scheduled thread :)

    My personal opinion is that a nutrient substrate WON'T HURT in any event. I have always used flourite, so cannot say from experience.
     
    #7 Gerryd, Dec 3, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 3, 2010
  8. Infulgeo

    Infulgeo Prolific Poster

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    Thanks for the plethera of information you've supplied Gerry in your posts and Tom Barr in your numerous stickies its definitely helping a newbie like me understand quite quickly :)
     
  9. nipat

    nipat Guru Class Expert

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    May be a surface skimming is important.

    [​IMG]

    In the picture, I have added water to a new tank to test.
    The tank had a bit of dust in it. So the water surface is full of dust after filling.
    Aiming a powerhead toward surface creates just a very small area of clean surface
    where gas exchange is good. It's dust here so it's easy to notice than protein film.
    It has been like this for nearly two weeks, not going away.
     
    #9 nipat, Jan 22, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2011
  10. Tug

    Tug Lifetime Charter Member
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    Have you tried testing O2 levels in a tank using a canister filter with a surface skimmer? IMO, adding a surface skimmer to the pump running CO2 would solve the O2 problem (with some reduction in flow), adding O2 during the day and at night when the CO2 is shut off, but I have miles to go before I can test this idea myself. Adding one to the canister filter should add some needed O2 as well. For now, I am using the Duetto multifilter as a skimmer/ needle wheel. My hope is that some needed O2 is getting mixed in as well until i go w/something less obtrusive.

    FWIW, in depth details for building wet/dry filters and adding bulkheads would be great information for your upcoming book.
     
    #10 Tug, Jan 26, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 26, 2011
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