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NYT article on a "Lake-Eating Monster"

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by rusticitas, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. rusticitas

    rusticitas Lifetime Charter Member
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    From the article: NY Times article: "In East Texas, Residents Take On a Lake-Eating Monster"

    I do not think I have ever seen this particular plant in the hobby, but this is probably a good reminder for us to be careful about what, and how, we dispose of our aquarium plants. Personally, I must say it is all to easy to forget and dump some without thinking!

    As a side-thead, where is a good source to find out about prohibited plants by country, state or locality?

    -Jason
     
  2. Signus

    Signus Prolific Poster

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    Fish and Wildlife Commissions of your state should have prohibited species lists for import and export regulations.

    Florida's Wildlife Commission example:

    Florida Prohibited and Restricted Fishes and Aquatic Organisms


    Good luck and thank you for your awareness! :)


    ------

    Sorry. That link sends you to prohibited and regulated fish, not plants.

    This link:

    Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida IFAS

    Will help you get directed towards invasive plants. As you'll see "Water Spinach" though tasty, is not a very nice addition to Florida's ecosystems.
     
  3. SpongeBob SquarePlants

    SpongeBob SquarePlants Prolific Poster

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    Too bad they can't an army of Hippopotamus to swim around in the lake and eat that plant. Can they actually stop a weed like that chemically without harming the rest of the plant/wildlife?
     
  4. Kampi

    Kampi Lifetime Charter Member
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    Hey,
    Exotic invasive plants are a big issue. I have been in the horticultural and restoration end of invasive plants. Getting out the herbicides to kill these is not as easy as you would think. There are all sorts of side effects, especially with fish. Fish seem to be poisoned easily with certain chemical herbicides. Native plants and insects 'in the way' can be eliminated as well.

    When I started to research aquariums, and looking at salt water aquarium keeping, I was surprised to see Caulerpa as a algae for salt water aquaria. An invasive one, Caulerpa taxifolia, has ruined native species habitat in parts of the Mediterranean. In the USA, there is a battle being waged in San Diego county, and parts of Orange county, California, to stop these algae from getting out of lagoons there. These were probably released by hobbyists and only one cell needs to survive to keep it going.

    Exotic Invasive plants on land and in waterways are a huge financial issue, and they will keep being a problem for the foreseeable future. Farmers, biologists, boaters, range managers, fire fighters, and restoration specialists battle these plants everyday. Some native species will become extinct because of these exotic invasive species (read about Hawaii).

    Not all exotic plants are an issue. The Cal-IPC web site is good; the Florida site, mentioned previously, is a good standard resource as well.

    This is part of the reason why future humans may refer to our current period as the Homogocene. Humans are moving: animals, plants, viruses and bacteria around out of their adapted (native) environments. Some of the exotics get loose and have no natural checks to keep them in hand - no Hippos in New York.

    Be careful with those plants you were thinking of dumping!

    Joseph (Kampi)

    Online References:
    California Invasive Plant Council
    Cal-IPC: About Us

    Weed - Organizational and Governmental Sites
    Cal-IPC: Organizational and Governmental Sites

    look up Homogocene online
     
  5. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    I suggest we introduce hippopotamus's in New York. That should do it. I'm assuming that hippos are just big friendly animals, with no adverse consequences to any other species. (Wait! I'm joking!)
     
  6. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    They already have an effective biocontrol agent, a weevil.
    Spraying also takes care of it.
    But it is a PITA and can cost a lot to treat.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  7. aquabillpers

    aquabillpers Lifetime Charter Member
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    Well, Vaughn, I disagree.

    I was casting for bass in a bay of Lake Ontario in New York when I hooked one. The bay was almost completely choked with Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton crispus, two invasive species that foul many of the small bays of that lake.

    I hooked something that I couldn't move and finally the line broke. I assumed that it was one of the hippopotamus that the state of NY uses for biological weed control. The water was quite murky, too.

    There is a downside to almost everything.

    :)

    Bill
     
  8. Signus

    Signus Prolific Poster

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    It's OT, but Florida does have the only American Hippopotamus since the last Ice Age. There was a big row about removing the hippo when a private ranch transferred over to the state parks. In order to alleviate that, the governor made him a Florida citizen.

    As far as I know, most hippos do most of their grazing on the land during the night rather than on aquatic vegetation.

    If you want a real lawnmower of water plants, releasing triploid grass carp is a sure-fire way to remove macrophytes.
     
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