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  1. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
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Not new to aquatic plants but.....

Discussion in 'Are you new to aquatic plants? Start here' started by cuban007, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. cuban007

    cuban007 Junior Poster

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    I am not new to aquatic plants but I have never used CO2. I would like to start using CO2 in my tanks. I have a 55gal, and a few that are 20g and 40g. Any tips on cost and installation??? Thanx.
     
  2. krucianking

    krucianking Junior Poster

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    I am a newbie to this site but a good co2 setup sets you back about 250 bucks
     
  3. gerryB

    gerryB Junior Poster

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    Yes, I agree with the $250 number as well. Your bigger expenses will be the initial cost of a cylinder (5lb maybe around $70-$80), and a decent dual stage regulator with a solenoid (ballpark $130+). You will also want a bubble counter (if not on regulator, not too much, and can DIY), a check valve, and CO2 resistant tubing. Of course, the gas isn't included in the cylinder - in my experience they run around $20 or so. You may be able to start off cheaper with 'paintball' type setups, but I wouldn't recommend this with your tank sizes. I use 5 lbs. cylinders myself.
     
  4. cuban007

    cuban007 Junior Poster

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    Thanx for the info.
     
  5. Melissa Morrison

    Melissa Morrison New Member

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    I know it is expensive to set up a new CO2 system (the cost of the tank and the regulator alone are quite pricey). However, take my advice and don't skimp on the diffuser/reactor like I did when I set mine up the first time. In the end, it is not worth it just to save a few bucks on the diffuser, because you won't get the results you are looking for if you are losing most of your CO2. Get a really good quality diffuser/reactor (or better yet DYI one with PVC for larger tanks) so that you get as close to 100% of your CO2 being dissolved into your tank water as possible. The fewer CO2 bubbles that escape to the surface, the better! And it saves you money in the long run when you don't have to fill up your tank as often.
     
    #5 Melissa Morrison, Feb 12, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2015
  6. Lksdrinker

    Lksdrinker Junior Poster

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    If you're not in a hurry keep an eye out on CL and all the various forums for used equipment. I hardly ever pay full price for any aquarium equipment anymore as there always seems to be someone selling something I need at quite a discount compared to new! So long as you dont simply buy without checking the item out you should get a good working piece of something for a fair deail.
     
  7. Freemananana

    Freemananana Junior Poster

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    I definitely agree with picking up second hand stuff. I would stick to forum for sale sections though.
     
  8. jard

    jard New Member

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    I agree with what Melissa said. I started with a good CO2 regulator + tank but I skimped on the CO2 reactor which reduced the effectiveness of injecting CO2. The DIY reactors are pretty affordable and effective. I think it pays off to not rush setting up you aquarium, so I would recommend looking at some of the DIY options and spend an extra week or two sourcing the parts and putting together a proven reactor.
     
  9. jeff123

    jeff123 Junior Poster

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    Hi. This is my 1st post. Since I am from Asia , that my case might not apply to you guys. Bought a Ista co2 system with solenoid. The tank is shiny that is all. But controlling it is other matter. I am regretting it now should have bought an industrial one. Slight price higher here but less headache...
     
  10. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Don't forget that some of what we play with you can find in home brewing or other applications. However "Kegerator" or "Aquarium" means specialty and that can mean serious money. Industrial is usually quality stuff as there's not a lot of market tolerance for blowing up your clients. For freshwater applications there's little need for stainless either so that's more money you can put towards other things.
     
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