My tank seems to be algae heaven.

Frolicsome_Flora

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The plants now seems to be going mad, my Hygrophilla Polysperma is thoroughly taking over one end, the Riccia is growing nicely now, even on the Barb grazed cave roof that I have. My Vallis that 10 months ago had litterally died out, is growing well now having reappeared from the depths of the sand and spreading out all over the place.

Ive decided to replace some of the older plants now, once Ive done that I might even do a pic.

Its amazing to see what solid EI and stable CO2 can do, in such a short time, I have a little bit of brown algae deep in the thicket of.. mutter, cant remember what its called.. but the Oto's are dealing with it slowly, and I think its going naturally now anyway.

I think my battle with algae is coming to a close, itll obviously never be over totally, as we always have some.. but the uncontrolable levels that I had even a month ago are a thing of the past now.
 

Frolicsome_Flora

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Things are pretty good now, scaping is a bit crouded, but its mainly because Im trying out a few different varieties of plants. In time, Ill thin that out to the strongest growers.

Its very young still, theres lots of vallis at the back infront of the middle java fern thats spreading like mad, and slowing getting some height. The HC on the right foreground has only just gone in as have a few others as youll probably notice.

All critisism welcome :)
 

David Hui

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Nice photo and I am glad to read your CO2 ordeal is over. Keep up the good work.
 

VaughnH

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That is a beautiful tank. Nice mix of hardscape and plants, too. Don't you just love it when it all comes together, even if it only lasts until the next problem?
 

Frolicsome_Flora

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Thank you so much for your comments :) Its such a great thing watching things growing up and maturing, and even the problems, while annoying at the time, only add to the magic of your garden afterwards.

Ill remove some species of plants as the strongest ones come apparent so it doesnt look quite so bitty, but Im so pleased with it so far. And its thanks to all of you really that its coming together.

Im going to have to move in about 6 months most likely, and after I do, and Im settled, I shall be buying a second tank thatll be much bigger. One thing that I find very hard is trying to scape such a narrow area.
 

Tom Barr

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Recall your experiences here.

It took but about 2-4 weeks to turn the hell of algae/poor plant growth around.
You know that these plants are "weeds".
You also know that excess nutrients do not cause algae.
You know how important CO2 is.

Look at the Riccia the most, it'll pearl well if you have good CO2.
Allow the plants to fill in more as time passes and phase out some of the groups and allow the ones you like the most/look the best for the section fill in and take up more room.

Consider using cork bark siliconed to equipment, tubing etc to hide it and add some java moss/fern/anubias on the cork with 16 gauge galvinized wire bent into U shaped staples about 1" long to hold the stems and moss on the cork.

If you keep up on things, the tank will keep growing well and look good.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Frolicsome_Flora

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The cork is a great idea :) and thats how I thought Id develop things further, get rid of some of the groups as time goes on, pick the ones I like the look at most.

The last few months has been a real learning experience, mostly over turning those websites that fill you with information about never dosing PO4 cos itll ruin your life etc. Now I understand the processes involved its all got alot simpler, and a whole lot less stressful, mainly because the hit and miss has gone thanks to EI. EI gives you far less to worry about, and therefore, I think, enables you to get your head around the other, mostly overlooked mechanics of the way the plants actually grow.

I still think my CO2 is a bit low, I freaked a bit when I gassed my fish last week, but now Ive decided to turn it up slowly, a little bit each day, watch the effects, turn it up a little more. Things still arent pearling to the levels that Ive seen elsewhere, but at least now I know that its just a matter of time and subtle changes to acheive what I want.
 

Tom Barr

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CO2 is the main thing to focus on.

I think micromangement is a bad method for newbies and folks how tire of playing with it when it offers you no real benefit over time.

I'd just rather simply the water changing method and semi automate that, then focus on why I got into the hobby: to grow plants and make nice scapes.

That's why most get into this hobby, not to learn about algae and how to outwit it with test kits and limitations etc.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Frolicsome_Flora

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Tom Barr;14245 said:
CO2 is the main thing to focus on.

I think micromangement is a bad method for newbies and folks how tire of playing with it when it offers you no real benefit over time.

I'd just rather simply the water changing method and semi automate that, then focus on why I got into the hobby: to grow plants and make nice scapes.

That's why most get into this hobby, not to learn about algae and how to outwit it with test kits and limitations etc.


Regards,
Tom Barr

I totally agree, its so easy to get caught up in the 'test kit trap', I think it encourages a lack of patience to be honest. You never also really find out whats going on, due to the total lack of accuracy of most of our tests, and besides.. as Bartman said on another thread, until you have seen your tank grow how it should be, you have no idea what to look for in the first place.

I love the gardening and design side the most, its the reason I got into it as well. Now I can watch things grow as they should be, I can concentrate on my plants and scaping.. and hopefully, create something beautiful. For me, what I get out of the hobby the most, is artistic expression. The fact that it also satisfies my scientific nature is a bonus, but Im now careful not to let that side run away with me.
 

Frolicsome_Flora

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Well, finished planting up the H. Callo now, thanks to Andy Greens generous freebie. Im excited now to let it grow up, and see what it looks like. Thanks for all your help everyone, without you lot Id never have gotton to this stage.



A quick note to everyone looking at this thread for algae issues. This is what can be done when you learn patience and listen to these amazing guys/girls and what they know :)
 

Tom Barr

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Let's see it in about 6 months.
Newly fixed/replanted tanks are not the best examples

Lush long term tanks are.

Fixing issues is one thing, that is something you can look at and see and know you are on the right track. A good skill to have.

Things change through time, we screw things up, some of us keep on things and have nice stabilty later. Whipping a tank back into shape is somethign many of us get good at.

But with good CO2, EI, you can get a long way to that end without a lot of effort.
Then it's a scaping/gardening job, which is what you wanted to do when you started this hobby.


Regards,
Tom Barr