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Mixing dry ferts into liquids....

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plant Fertilization' started by redblufffishguy, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. redblufffishguy

    redblufffishguy Junior Poster

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    I need help, I have been searching the site looking for a basic recipe for mixing the following ferts K2SO4, KH2PO4, KNO3, together with water to make a generic starter fert for my 29 gallon tank. I bought a LFS store liquid fert that used those elements, so I bought a pound each of the following;K2SO4, KH2PO4, KNO3. I also bought Plantex CSM+B but will be mixing it separately.

    If anyone can provide (or point me to one) a basic starting recipe for me it would be appreciated. I would like to be able to add a capful (5ml or 15 ml) per day or every other day to the tank.

    For reference, the tank is currently moderately planted with various Cryptocornes and Anubius plants. I will be adding several other species very soon. I have two 24" HO T-5 bulbs and a dual strip of LEDs as well. I will be adding CO2 once my new regulator arrives. PH is about 7.2 temp is 78f. Substrate is 100% flourite. I am using some sort of plant-tab for the root, but will be purchasing the ones from www.plantedaquariumfewrtilizer.com when I run out.

    Thank you in advance for help,

    RBFG
     
  2. Christophe

    Christophe Subscriber
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    The calculator for this is at http://calc.petalphile.com. You can set this up for your custom solutions pretty easily.

    It's best if you know your actual working volume, typically a few gallons less than your nominal 29g due to substrate, rocks, etc.

    - - - Updated - - -

    The calculator for this is at http://calc.petalphile.com. You can set this up for your custom solutions pretty easily.

    It's best if you know your actual working volume, typically a few gallons less than your nominal 29g due to substrate, rocks, etc.
     
  3. redblufffishguy

    redblufffishguy Junior Poster

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    re

    My actual water volume for the tank is 24 gallons. I found the link and was able to enter the parameters I wanted; however, when I hit the "gimmie" button noting happened, am I missing something?

    Any others out there with advice?

    RBFG
     
  4. redblufffishguy

    redblufffishguy Junior Poster

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    re re

    Got the calculator to work. It is telling me that I need to add more K2SO4 than is soluble in water. It is calling for 151 g/500 ml, which will provide about 7.5 ppm/5 ml dose. I was thinking 90 g/500 ml, which will provide about 4.45 ppm/5 ml dose.

    Can anyone tell me what concentration I should mix that will provide an ample amount of K2SO4 for the plants and be soluble in water?

    Thanks,

    RBFG
     
  5. junglefowl

    junglefowl Junior Poster

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    That's the site I use to mix my liquid ferts. Try to mix and use the liquid in 2 months or less. You probably use KNO3 more than the others in macro ferts
     
  6. PhilipS

    PhilipS Lifetime Members
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    Or use rota.la

    All you need is a digital gram scale. Nothing fancy.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Or use rota.la

    All you need is a digital gram scale. Nothing fancy.
     
  7. gsjmia

    gsjmia Lifetime Members
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    Double the water to 1,000ml, keep the K2SO4 the same, and dose 10ml
     
  8. Joey

    Joey New Member

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    For the K2SO4 you won't need to dose much. The KNO3 and KH2PO4 will add enough K already for your plants.

    This will provide a little SO4 and a little extra K. You don't need to add much, should be plenty.
     
  9. Joey

    Joey New Member

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    ..........
     
    #9 Joey, Sep 20, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 21, 2014
  10. caveman

    caveman Junior Poster

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    Some other thoughts and links on mixing solutions

    An earlier post noted this comprehensive dosing calculator:
    http://calc.petalphile.com/

    It is very helpful, but I do not rely on it 100% for every product or chemical I use. It is always good to check it against your own math or other sites, especially if it is the first time you are adding something to your tank.

    When I create a solution, before adding any to a tank, I will usually drop 1-5 ml into a bucket with 1 gallon of water and test the resulting ppm of solute in the solution myself (providing I have the appropriate test kit). For a dry fertilizer you are mixing yourself, you want to be sure you received exactly what you think you purchased. I note I bought a dry mix once from a noted fertilizer provider and their recommended dosing differed significantly with what my own mixing and testing revealed. It was still a great deal, but had I blindly added it, I would have overdosed. You also want to catch any measuring errors you may have made along the way.

    It depends on the chemical too. Some elements, like Potassium (K), are less dangerous to your plants and fish in high doses than others, like Iron (Fe). For mixing something like Metricide 14, you need to be very certain you know exactly what you are putting in your tank.

    I also use some of these chemistry calculator sites for mixing, double checking and dosing:

    Solubility
    http://wwwchem.csustan.edu/chem1112/1112UnknownNEWed1.htm

    Dilution
    http://www.physiologyweb.com/calculators/percent_solutions_calculator.html

    http://www.endmemo.com/bio/dilution.php

    Molecular Mass
    http://www.lenntech.com/calculators/molecular/molecular-weight-calculator.htm

    The chemistry and math involved is pretty basic. I picked it up pretty quick with no previous experience. Good luck!
     
  11. Julia Adkins

    Julia Adkins aquariumfertilizer.com
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    The basic mixing ratio for all of those that we recommend is 1/4 cup fertilizer to 2 cups water. Our recommendation is 1-4 drops per gallon starting with a low dose of 1-2 drops per gallon. Stay with this dose for 2-3 weeks before increasing by 1 drop per gallon. There are about 75 drops in a teaspoon or 5 ml. We also carry graduated dispenser bottle that have a separate dosing chamber that work very well for mixing and dosing. Only mix a quantity of any fertilizer that you will use in a month or less and keep it in a cool dark place. Dry fertilizers will keep practically forever as long as they are kept dry as they are inert materials. Once they are in solution any microscopic critter that finds its way into the solution will be grateful for the food. It will then grow and reproduce which can make the solution cloudy and clumpy as well as using up the nutrients.
     
  12. Julia Adkins

    Julia Adkins aquariumfertilizer.com
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    Remember that micro or trace nutrients are called that because only a small amount is needed.
     
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