Lifecycle of hair algae

Homer_Simpson

Prolific Poster
Oct 11, 2007
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Your tank is absolutely beautiful despite your issues and I can only dream of getting my tanks to look 1/2 as good.

I know that the focus should always be on trying to address the root cause(s) to try and eliminate the algae, but over the short term, have you considered purchasing a thread algae eating fish like Florida Flagfish, or Black Molly(lol, make sure you don't get a female or you could end up with many unexpected baby mollies) to contain the problem until your other actions eliminate it.

Just a thought.
 

Tex Gal

Junior Poster
Nov 14, 2007
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Joshua, TX
Your tank looks great. I can't wait to see it when the foreground grows in! :) I see you have the gold algae eaters! I love those guys. I have 3 in my tank.

I have read that the thread algae is one of the hardest to kill. I don't know why atrixnet didn't see the peroxide work. I spot treated some driftwood with little tuffs of BBA mixed in at the bottom of Java Fern and it fizzled with oxygen for about 20 min and then in about an hour, turned white. I put some blxya tuffs in a solution in a bowl and the same thing happened. There weren't tuffs but there were spots and they are gone. Maybe it depends on the newness of the peroxide or something. I know that it looses it's strength when exposed to light so if you mix up your solution and don't put the plants in right away it can loose it's strength. If you looked at that last link I posted you can see the results of that guys tank for yourself. Anyway... I just know it worked for me and I didn't turn my filter off - as a matter of fact the driftwood I treated was right by my filter output. I guess it's true what they say, each tank is different.

I had found that I had a faulty needle valve on my regulator and that was compromising my Co2 output and probably a contributor of my BBA, besides the fact that I had just gone high tech.:D
 

Homer_Simpson

Prolific Poster
Oct 11, 2007
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On the topic of hydrogen peroxide and I know that this is a little off topic. BE VERY CAREFUL IF YOU SOAK PLANTS IN IT. Sometimes, it takes experience for us to learn things the hard way because no one else may know or have experience this. I had some Apongenton bulbs and dwarf sag that were covered with algae. They were in a tank that I had to tear apart and so I figured why not transfer them to a tank where the plants were healthy, considering that they still had a excellent root growth and looked healthy apart from the algae. I soaked the plants whole including roots in a solution of 1ml hydrogen peroxide per 1 gallon water in a 5 gallon bucket, so that would be a total of 5 ml in 5 gallons water(not particularly strong). The soak got rid of the algae, none of the leaves melted, the roots still appeared intact and healthy. When I planted them in a tank with great plant growth(c02 injection, regular fert, great lighting) where all the plants were doing well, within 3days of planting the plant, the water began to cloud a little bit. The water smelled like a sewer. I cannot be sure of what caused this but I don't believe it was coincidental that this happened 3 days after planted the tanks soaked in hydrogen peroxide. Eventhough the roots did not appear harmed, I believe that the roots were so harmed by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide that the plants were unable to acclimitize and the roots rotted when planted and this set off a chain reaction causing the rot to spread and effect the roots of other plants. It was a real disaster and wish that I had never transferred those plants. It was too late for a series of water changes. I tried this and it did not work and I had to tear the tank down as it just got worse by the day. Even the anubias leaves were prematurely falling off.

Make a long story short. IF YOU ARE GOING TO USE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE DO NOT SOAK ROOTS IN THE SOLUTION.
 

Tom Barr

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Jan 23, 2005
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You might wanna get that sword out of the front and the Anubias as well, run them in back and the Anubias up near the corner going up/back etc.

check out the dutch scape thread here, you might see a design or scheme you like.

You also have Spirogyra, might wanna remove as much as you can, it can be a bit tough to get rid of, but manual incessant removal can do it.

Cladophora is another beast:eek:
Neither H2O2 nor Excel works well on these two.
They are, for most practical selective purposes, more like plants/mosses.
Enviornmental conditions seem to be the best method of control, namely CO2.

Like BBA, once you stop new growth, you can beat it.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 

jaidexl

Prolific Poster
Oct 17, 2006
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Fort Myers Florida
Tom Barr;21689 said:
You also have Spirogyra, might wanna remove as much as you can, it can be a bit tough to get rid of, but manual incessant removal can do it.
Just to elaborate a tad more on that, this is what I've been doing with my spiro, incessant removal. Would you agree that I should stick to my guns with dosing rather than attempt starvation? I don't have a problem with removing it and being patient, I just want to be sure that patience and steady EI is the right path that I'm taking.


Side note: spinning a pipe cleaner has to be the easiest method of spiro removal I've ever stumbled upon. :)