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Introducing the HPT100 ~ Victor's Mini Dual Stage Regulator

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by Matt F., Sep 21, 2013.

  1. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Well, I don't think anyone else has built one yet. The Victor HPT100 is Victor's answer to the need for an ultra compact dual stage regulator that does not sacrifice quality for size. The HPT100 regulator is chrome plated brass with stainless diaphragms. It's a high purity regulator just like the HPT500, but in a smaller package. Here are some pictures of a build I did for a client:

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    Here the HPT100 is next to an HPT500:
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    Pics of the unit prior to the build:
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    #1 Matt F., Sep 21, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 21, 2013
  2. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Here are some pics of the build:
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  3. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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  4. Asmack Arabia

    Asmack Arabia Banned

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    nice build. is the reg cheaper than the HPT500 ?
     
  5. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Hi, I think they retail for less than the HPT500, but you'd have to check with your distributor.

     
  6. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Much nicer. I think if you do this at a larger scale, go with this and all brass, SS just cost too much vs what you get out of the SS vs Brass.
    If they used the liquid filled or cool digital pressure gauges, then you'd be talking.
     
  7. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Much nicer. I think if you do this at a larger scale, go with this and all brass, SS just cost too much vs what you get out of the SS vs Brass.
    If they used the liquid filled or cool digital pressure gauges, then you'd be talking.
     
  8. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Yeah, this smaller regulator is the way to go I think. You still get stainless diaphragms and they are cheaper than the HPT500. Oldpunk suggested that we come up with a more compact post body configuration to compliment the smaller body. That will take some doing. We want the post body to be as compact and ergonomic as possible. I like things to be tucked away. The one thing you're going to have to contend with is the fact that you have to reduce from 1/4"npt to 1/8"npt, there is not much we can do to reduce the size of the components. So the only thing we can do is use different/fewer fittings. This might actually cut the cost a bit, too. Fewer fittings = less cost.

     
  9. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Just found this thread. Looks like there might be one or two HPT100s out there being used by hobbyists. But I don't see that this particular one is 'built.'
    http://www.barrreport.com/showthread.php/10722-Victor-HPT-100-regulator

    This particular one looks to be used or surplus. So a quick check on ebay is in order for those of you who want to risk buying used. You can save a bunch of money, though if you find a functioning regulator over there. Worth a shot.
     
    #9 Matt F., Sep 24, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2013
  10. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    1. HTP 100 Victor(same size as the medalist series)

    2. 1/4-1/8 reducing

    3. Brass MPT 1/8" elbow

    4. Burket brass solenoid

    5. Needle Valve: the Ideal with the vernier handle are nice, but cost a fair amount. Fabco seems a bit cheap to me.

    6. Clippard makes cheaper Brass check valves.

    7. Brass 1/8" FPT and 3/16" barbed end(better than those 3 piece lock one tubing arrays, PITA to add and remove tubing, cheaper too)
    1/8" is too small, the higher pressures will loosen it and leak. 3/16 takes some work, but hot water and the microwave works super.
    Also a good way to clean Tygon food grade tubing also, 30 sec in the microwave kills algae and anything else.

    8. Rio or similar powerhead to a reactor housing. Feed CO2 into the powerhead's suction side. Add dual venturi loop and pre set height to degas the chamber if it drops below a pre set volume height.
     
  11. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    1. HTP 100 Victor(same size as the medalist series)

    2. 1/4-1/8 reducing

    3. Brass MPT 1/8" elbow

    4. Burket brass solenoid

    5. Needle Valve: the Ideal with the vernier handle are nice, but cost a fair amount. Fabco seems a bit cheap to me.

    6. Clippard makes cheaper Brass check valves.

    7. Brass 1/8" FPT and 3/16" barbed end(better than those 3 piece lock one tubing arrays, PITA to add and remove tubing, cheaper too)
    1/8" is too small, the higher pressures will loosen it and leak. 3/16 takes some work, but hot water and the microwave works super.
    Also a good way to clean Tygon food grade tubing also, 30 sec in the microwave kills algae and anything else.

    8. Rio or similar powerhead to a reactor housing. Feed CO2 into the powerhead's suction side. Add dual venturi loop and pre set height to degas the chamber if it drops below a pre set volume height.
     
  12. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    That's another way to do it. As you know I prefer the Swagelok check valve (as redundancy) and tube adapters (ferrules, tube inserts and all). Had issues with clippard check valves. I also use an ADA in-line check valve.


     
    #12 Matt F., Sep 24, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2013
  13. oldpunk

    oldpunk Guru Class Expert

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    aquarium

    I don't agree with the comment about the swagelok tube fittings. What could be easier than just busting out a wrench and giving the fitting a quick turn? Just as easy to re-install. It sucks in my opinion to have to yank tubing off a barb. To each his own...
     
  14. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Swagelok tube fittings: it sucks if you do not have the inserts and extras laying around to connect to the fitting. The ferrules come with(most times), but the tube adapters not always and then you need the ADA 4/6 mm tubing.
    Getting those items on the tubing is another matter. 30 sec in the micro wave, the tygon tubing is own and it is extremely easy to redo/remove in the future. Done it few 100 times.
    Clippard check valves, not the barbed dinky cheap ones(10/32's), but the larger MPT/FPT 1/8" ones are pretty similar to the brass swageloks.
     
  15. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Swagelok tube fittings: it sucks if you do not have the inserts and extras laying around to connect to the fitting. The ferrules come with(most times), but the tube adapters not always and then you need the ADA 4/6 mm tubing.
    Getting those items on the tubing is another matter. 30 sec in the micro wave, the tygon tubing is own and it is extremely easy to redo/remove in the future. Done it few 100 times.
    Clippard check valves, not the barbed dinky cheap ones(10/32's), but the larger MPT/FPT 1/8" ones are pretty similar to the brass swageloks.
     
  16. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    I may have to try the hose barbs, then. It does eliminate some logistical steps. I, on the other hand, have the inserts and extra ferrule sets on hand at any given time. For all the needed part numbers, see here (***look at post # 21-22***):

    http://www.barrreport.com/showthread.php/8226-How-to-use-Swagelok-tube-fittings

    With the Swagelok tube adapters, you do need an account to be able to order parts online, but this literally takes 5 minutes to create. The components are cheap, but there is a minimum order on the ferrules kits. Should last you a few years if you change your tubing more than I do. For my builds, if a client requests extra tubing inserts and ferrules, I can order for them. Or if they foresee needing to change their tubing, all they have to do is contact me.

    I had a problem with the 1/8"npt brass Clippard check valve. See my VTS253B-320 build thread. COuld have been because the stupid JBJ bubbler counter leaked all the contents into the check valve, but it made a VERY annoying noise for a VERY long time. Not sure if the backpressure in the system cause it or something else. I think I ordered the one with the 1 psi cracking pressure. Still it shouldn't have made noise, IMO. Since them I use Swagelok check valves. They are about $25 in brass, IIRC, and seem to last longer and has a 1/3 PSI cracking pressure. D

    Tom, I have to look at Tygon's site. Could be that they have the equivalent of 4mm/6mm pressure resistant tubing. If so, this might be a better option for those who want to run more than 3 meters of tubing at a time. ;)


     
  17. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Cheaper, less tension upon such a small part which hobbyists will CLEARLY APPLY, does not look as snazzy, but 1/8 pipe thread to a mean old 3/16" barbed end is a simple hard to break item, easy to cut or wiggle off(not easy, just cut a little bit of hose, then cut the remainder off the barbed end if you need to pull it, or use a clean check valve about 3-4" down the line for a point of removal).

    3 little pieces added are going to require replacement if you move things around much at some point, they also are much more prone to leakage than say the tygon thick tubing and the 3/16" barb, not too much to go wrong there unless you tubing cracks open.
    Once you see it, then you can quickly tell what is a simple cheap but top notch approach.

    1st goal is no pulling off or leakage. 3/16" barbed ends make this possible.
    1/8" barbed? Do not use those.

    Tygon tubing is widely available and microwaveable and autoclaveable also. The thick pliable tubing is great.
    Last for many many years.
     
  18. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Cheaper, less tension upon such a small part which hobbyists will CLEARLY APPLY, does not look as snazzy, but 1/8 pipe thread to a mean old 3/16" barbed end is a simple hard to break item, easy to cut or wiggle off(not easy, just cut a little bit of hose, then cut the remainder off the barbed end if you need to pull it, or use a clean check valve about 3-4" down the line for a point of removal).

    3 little pieces added are going to require replacement if you move things around much at some point, they also are much more prone to leakage than say the tygon thick tubing and the 3/16" barb, not too much to go wrong there unless you tubing cracks open.
    Once you see it, then you can quickly tell what is a simple cheap but top notch approach.

    1st goal is no pulling off or leakage. 3/16" barbed ends make this possible.
    1/8" barbed? Do not use those.

    Tygon tubing is widely available and microwaveable and autoclaveable also. The thick pliable tubing is great.
    Last for many many years.
     
  19. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Here is the part numbers for Swagelok barbed 3/16" ID hose adapter (1/8"NPT male and female):

    3/16" hose (ID) 1/8" Male NPT: b-3-HC-1-2

    3/16" hose (ID) 1/8" female NPT: b-3-hc-7-2

    I'll start giving people the option between a tube adapter and a hose barb.



     
  20. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    I agree with you, and I run tube adapters on all my personal rigs, but we have a Swagelok account and like tinkering with mechanical stuff. ;)
    Most people don't read the instruction guide on how to use tube adapters. Most don't know (despite being clear in the DIY threads) that you need to replace the ferrules and tube insert every time. Hose adapter is easier in that you push it on and wiggle it off. I don't think the hose adapter is leak-proof by any means. The tube adapter is leak proof provided you use pressure resistant tubing (tygon, ADA, or Swagelok tubing) and don't over torque the nut (1.25 turns beyond hand snug).

    I think people should have the choice. The info for and against the use of tube adapters is out there. You and I recommend tube adapters. Tom dislikes them. I'm sure there are others, too. Makes connecting CO2 line harder and impossible if you don't have the replacement parts.


     
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