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I'm back and wondering if the experts would way in

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by Infulgeo, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. Infulgeo

    Infulgeo Prolific Poster

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    Hey guys haven't posted in a bit but i've pretty much decided i will have several forms of aquatic life as soon as the house is renovated. In the mean time i want to test my situation (Being sick) and see if i can handle a tank in general.
    I know that nano's can be really difficult but i was wondering if i used the low tech method and kept just like a 10-15 gallon with a few fish or a betta if it would still be really low maintenance and manageable. My thought process is that i could get the hang of small dosing and see if this could all work out for me. Unfortunately i don't have any more room for a tank bigger than a 10-15 gallon really.
    Suggestions, comments, questions? Please weigh in and help me out :)
    Stocking:
    2-5 fish that are an inch or less
    OR
    Betta

    Maybe some shrimp? keep the tank clean?(hate snails :p)

    Plants:
    Corkscrew Vals
    -Dwarf Hairgrass Parvula

    thanks for the continue assistance,
    -Nick
     
  2. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    No Expert I, Not That That Ever Stops Me Answering!

    Hi,

    I do not see a problem either way. :)

    I recommend a deep sand bed. :gw

    No need for canisters filters or sump; just an internal pump of 7-15 times turnover, even an air pump and air stone arrangement can be sufficient.

    Not much to it; you can experiment with 2-liter soda bottles, half-gallon or gallon jars. :)

    Patients more than skill. :cool:

    Biollante
     
    #2 Biollante, Jan 19, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 19, 2011
  3. Infulgeo

    Infulgeo Prolific Poster

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    15 times turn over wouldn't blow the plants into the wall or anything would it?
    thanks,
    -Nick
     
  4. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    0.5 To 40 Volumes Per Hour Will Do

    Hi Nick,

    No, 15 or even 25 times tank turnover per hour will not harm the plants. I run a little tank here on my desk at 32-35 turnovers per hour. :eek: The plants adapt. :) If you do the arithmetic on even slow moving water in rivers or lakes, you will find the current we develop in our aquariums doesn’t even come close.

    For a DSB really low turnovers work as well. I know of some folk that recommend less then one tank turnover per hour, I am not sure of the rationale.

    I have run DSB with air pumps and stones for years that work wonderfully and grow plants well. :)

    A decent air pump and a few air stones or “wands” will actually move a considerable volume of water creating good flow. :cool:

    Biollante
     
    #4 Biollante, Jan 20, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 20, 2011
  5. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi infulgeo,

    I am running a Rena xp2 on my 10g and it's just perfect.
     
  6. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    How Simple, How Complicated & How Able Are We When The Seal Breaks

    Hi Nick,

    Using a canister filter as barbarossa41(6?)22 suggests, is an answer, however it complicates the maintenance a bit. It will allow higher critter loads and requires a bit less patients in getting started.

    The question of your health now and your prognosis, since the tank is something you can enjoy for many years.

    Having spent a couple of years seriously ill myself and having to manage a chronic condition, I know maintenance schedules take a back seat to the realities of our health.

    I am in the fortunate situation of having helpers that care for my complex systems. :) People that know what to do when the seal breaks and the water is on the floor. :(

    During those years I developed a real appreciation for three of my tanks that I could care for myself, mostly. It gave me great comfort to have something I knew I could handle myself and if I was unable for a little bit, someone could feed them every now and again, top off the water and nothing bad would happen.:)

    Once you move up the technical complexity scale more attention has to be paid to other issues. :gw

    Biollante
     
    #6 Biollante, Jan 20, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 20, 2011
  7. Tug

    Tug Lifetime Charter Member
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    Hi Nick,
    Marineland makes the Duetto internal multi-filter (DJ-100) that would provide 7-9 times turnover. I have one running on a timer in a ten gallon planted tank for added circulation when I want it, mostly at night. Remove all of the filter media to keep from cleaning it once a week (keep the AC filter for emergencies). It's an option, but any small power head would likely work. As Bio points out, a small DIY CO2 generator might be easier to care for then you think. Yeast generators require patience as much as anything. Good luck.
     
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