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Hygro and neglect

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by aquabillpers, Oct 3, 2014.

  1. aquabillpers

    aquabillpers Lifetime Charter Member
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    Hello,

    I am a charter member of this excellent forum. I've been away for a few years for all the usual reasons, but I've continued to maintain three tanks, low tech and healthy.

    I keep mainly Endler's livebearers. In my 29 gallon tank I have some carnivorous characins to keep the Endler's population under control. American flag fish do the same in the smaller tanks. Still, some survive. Except for feeding the fish and an occasional pruning when the tanks get just too full of plants, none have received any attention.

    With the advent of winter here in PA, USA, I've started to look more closely at what I have. One surprising thing (to me) is that I have some huge Endler's, with males up to 1.5 inches long and females the size of guppies. A second thing, and the inspiration of this post, is the state of my Hygrophila polysperma.

    That is the dominant plant in two 10 gallon tanks. It is a pest because it grows so fast, but the leaves are green, without holes, and shaped like its leaves should be.

    I've read posts about problems with this plant, wondering if inadequate light or nutrients or CO2 might be the cause. Maybe they get to much attention?

    Regards, Bill
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Sounds fair enough to me, non cO2, low tech, wait and let the weeds take over, often there's more sense to that than fretting over every little thing.
    I would say given the % success, non CO2 low tech methods are more successful for the aquarist. Goals a bit different, but the success is higher.
     
  3. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
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    Local Time:
    6:19 AM
    Sounds fair enough to me, non cO2, low tech, wait and let the weeds take over, often there's more sense to that than fretting over every little thing.
    I would say given the % success, non CO2 low tech methods are more successful for the aquarist. Goals a bit different, but the success is higher.
     
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