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Humic Acid And Nutrient Absorbtion

Discussion in 'Advanced Strategies and Fertilization' started by #1 Plant Boy, Aug 24, 2018.

  1. #1 Plant Boy

    #1 Plant Boy New Member

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    Does adding a source of humic acid to the water help with the uptake of other nutrients of aquatic plants
     
  2. f-fish

    f-fish New Member

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    Limited experience and totally anecdotal - I found that adding fulvic acid boosted growth on bucephalandra that had stagnated. So I would have to assume something in the uptake allowed for better nutrient uptake that then boosted growth?

    Later Ferdie
     
  3. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Does adding driftwood help make plants grow?
     
  4. f-fish

    f-fish New Member

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    Lol - I see where you are going with your train of thought. Dead and decaying wood should among other things dump some form of humus into your tank, but does this make plants grow ... now this ain't peat or coal you are talking about but just a bit of wood. Over time in a balanced tank sure why will it not play a part in helping the ecosystem support plant growth. As to the OP's question about humic acid in the context of the aquarium - I would rather look at the more soluble fulvic acid over a wider pH range to potentially play a part in nutrient uptake. If you are going to add "snake oil" - give it a fighting chance and let it play nice in water at our typical pH levels.

    Later Ferdie
     
  5. #1 Plant Boy

    #1 Plant Boy New Member

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    I was thinking in a natural setting were aquatic plants grow. There are diffrent sources where plants get there nutrients from. One them could be from the decay of diffrent leaf or wood material. One of the substances in their being humic acid could contribute to plant growth because it is part of the system where all other nutrient sources are part of in a natural growing aquatic environment. I know that in land plants that humic and fluvic' acid helps in increase plant root growth and metabolism. So was wanting to know if it was observed in aquatic plants.
     
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