How to wire a Burkert type 6011 solenoid

thegasman

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I know this is an older thread, but thanks Matt. I just used this info. to wire up my Burkert and it made the job a whole lot easier.
 

Matt F.

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I'm glad the thread is still helping people! Congrats on wiring your own.

Best,

Matt

thegasman;93203 said:
I know this is an older thread, but thanks Matt. I just used this info. to wire up my Burkert and it made the job a whole lot easier.
 

chocological

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I'm not usually one to resurrect old threads, but I just bookmarked this one today. It surely will help me in the near future.
 

Matt F.

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Makes writing the thread worthwhile for me. Thanks for posting. Good luck on your future wiring job. If you have any questions, ask away.

chocological;115143 said:
I'm not usually one to resurrect old threads, but I just bookmarked this one today. It surely will help me in the near future.
 

herns

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Burkert Solenoid

I just had my Burkert solenoid re-wired to an adapter. After I plug to an outlet to test, I heard no clicking sound. Is this normal?

I wonder because my other Burkert I got from freshwatersystem always had a "clicking" sound and so does my Parker solenoid.
Here is the Burkert model I got.

IMAG0832_zpsb7df96b9.jpg


Thanks.
 

Matt F.

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I don't know what kind of solenoid that is, so it could be normal. the Type 6011s most of us run all do the "click" when the solenoid is electrified and again when the power is shut off. I'd double check the electrical connections, too. Could be that the connections are different, or that the unit isn't getting power. The type 6011 uses 120AC, the one you show uses 24 volts DC. Not sure the specs of that model.
 
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herns

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Matt F.;115917 said:
I don't know what kind of solenoid that is, so it could be normal. the Type 6011s most of us run all do the "click" when the solenoid is electrified and again when the power is shut off. I'd double check the electrical connections, too. Could be that the connections are different, or that the unit isn't getting power. The type 6011 uses 120AC, the one you show uses 24 volts DC. Not sure the specs of that model.

I just found the answer Ive been looking.
Thanks!

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showpost.php?p=2082478&postcount=14

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showpost.php?p=2275169&postcount=166
 
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Matt F.

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I remember when Bettatail was claiming that the 2822s he found on ebay were "better" than the type 6011s. That's Mumbojumbo! Glad you found the info. to help you in your particular situation. Personally I dislike appliances that require fancy wiring and converters, etc. If I have the option, I'd go with the U.S. standard 120V. A 3 prong grounded plus is a much cleaner install, IMO.

herns;115921 said:
 
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herns

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I have been using 6011's in 2 of my regulators. I also got one Parker in another assembly and I can hear audibly the clicking sounds of these solenoids when turned on. I was very surprised when I re-wired and tested 2822 when I did not hear any click sound at all. Very silent. I have to place close to my ear to listen as it opens.

The wiring of 2822 is just smaller and yeah, I agree with you that 3 wires solenoid is cleaner.
 

Matt F.

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Whatever works is my philosophy--as long as it works as intended. Personally, I just tend to be less experimental when it comes to selecting parts. ;)

herns;115930 said:
I have been using 6011's in 2 of my regulators. I also got one Parker in another assembly and I can hear audibly the clicking sounds of these solenoids when turned on. I was very surprised when I re-wired and tested 2822 when I did not hear any click sound at all. Very silent. I have to place close to my ear to listen as it opens.

The wiring of 2822 is just smaller and yeah, I agree with you that 3 wires solenoid is cleaner.
 

oliverpool

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I noticed recently that my 6011 does not seem to shut co2 totally. Once my photo period is off, the bubble count slows down and within 30 to 60 mins, its goes to something like 1 bubble every 15-20secs. IT does this all the way to the next day when my photo period starts again. Not sure what could be the problem? Somethink stuck in the solenoid? What can I do to correct this?
 

Tom Barr

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Sounds like the solenoid is not closing entirely.

You can use the gas tank and open the valve up directly(no regulator on of it, and blast the gas/air mix into the solenoid to hopefully blast anything out of the valve and then see if you can blow any air through it etc.
Sometimes, you can take the thing apart and find something causing the sticking.
Often times, you end up having to buy a new one.
 

Tom Barr

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Sounds like the solenoid is not closing entirely.

You can use the gas tank and open the valve up directly(no regulator on of it, and blast the gas/air mix into the solenoid to hopefully blast anything out of the valve and then see if you can blow any air through it etc.
Sometimes, you can take the thing apart and find something causing the sticking.
Often times, you end up having to buy a new one.
 

Matt F.

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I think Tom is right. Sounds like something is preventing the solenoid from closing fully. Most likely a piece of Teflon tape of other contaminant. You can remove the needle valve, raise the working pressure, and plug the solenoid in to "blow" the contaminant out (make sure to do this with a window open and your hand on the electrical plug to stop the flow of gas). This is the easiest way to remove the particle. If you have a burkert solenoid, make sure the gas flow is in the correct direction; otherwise, this could cause a leak, too.
 

dutchy

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Sometimes it's just the gas pressure that is too high. 7 psi is basically enough, except if you use an atomizer it needs to be higher.

Mine does not close fully at 14 psi, but perfectly at 7 psi.
 
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oldpunk

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dutchy;116386 said:
Sometimes it's just the gas pressure that is too high. 7 psi is basically enough, except if you use an atomizer it needs to be higher.

Mine does not close fully at 14 psi, but perfectly at 7 psi.

This just isn't true. Chances are that you have a very small spec of something stuck in your solenoid too. Burkert actually recommends running a screen upstream from your solenoid to prevent this. You wouldn't believe how small of a piece of something can keep it from sealing completely.
 

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dutchy;116386 said:
Sometimes it's just the gas pressure that is too high. 7 psi is basically enough, except if you use an atomizer it needs to be higher.

Mine does not close fully at 14 psi, but perfectly at 7 psi.

You might want to try and blow out the dust or whatever is caught in there.

Some folks that do not use check valves...get back wash every night that will lead up the solenoid and can rust and corrode some parts.
Not saying this is your case, but stuff can get in there and cause issues.

Blow it out and give it a good cleaning.
 

Tom Barr

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dutchy;116386 said:
Sometimes it's just the gas pressure that is too high. 7 psi is basically enough, except if you use an atomizer it needs to be higher.

Mine does not close fully at 14 psi, but perfectly at 7 psi.

You might want to try and blow out the dust or whatever is caught in there.

Some folks that do not use check valves...get back wash every night that will lead up the solenoid and can rust and corrode some parts.
Not saying this is your case, but stuff can get in there and cause issues.

Blow it out and give it a good cleaning.
 

Tom Barr

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dutchy;116400 said:
Sorry, I'm just making things up to look interesting ;)

Give a good clean and see if there's any difference.

I've pull all sorts of crap out of CO2 sets ups for some of the new client's.
I clean and inspect these days, I use to simply swap the parts out and toss them in the past.

Not a bad idea no matter what.