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How to set up a nano?

Discussion in 'Are you new to aquatic plants? Start here' started by GillesF, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    Hi guys

    I went to a local aquarium shop yesterday and as soon as I spotted the new Aquatic Nature nano tanks I simply fell in love with them. I think a small nano tank (about 15 liters max) would look great on my bookcase next to my bigger tank. I already have a small tank at my parents' home with CRS so I can easily transfer them to the new tank.

    I do have some questions about the equipment and the scaping though:

    1) What about CO2? Is it possible to split up the CO2 of my large tank to my nano and regulate it separately?
    2) Are those hang-on filters quiet and reliable? My bed is near my large aquarium which can be heard but the Eheim filter on that tank produces a low humming sound, nothing annoying. I wouldn't want the hang on filter to produce "leaking" sounds though ...
    3) How about lighting? Is there something I should look at?
    4) Any interesting scapes that I could use as an example? I'm not used to scaping in square aquariums and I wonder if this is more difficult than in larger ones. I'll look through some aquascaping sites but links are always welcome.

    Here's Aquatic Nature's site:

    http://www.aquatic-nature.be/2eng_cocoon.html

    I like Cocoon 1 & 4. Other brands are possible too, e.g. Dennerle Nano Cube (looks great imo and you have the possibility to just buy the tank without the equipment), Superfish Aquacube (I'm not too fond of the design, but well made), ...
     
  2. joshvito

    joshvito Prolific Poster

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    You may want to just get a Finnex setup.
    I am using the Finnex light that this setup comes with, its pretty bright. (unsure bout the PAR)
    You can find a 4gallon on Amazon.

    Here is the link
     
    #2 joshvito, Dec 17, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 17, 2010
  3. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    Looks like a nice nano but unfortunately they won't ship to Belgium ...
    As far as I know, SuperFish, Aquatic Nature and Dennerle are the only "nano brands" available in Belgium
     
  4. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    You didn't really say how you were providing the CO2 but....

    If you use DIY, then a simple gang valve from the reactor will let you split the line and allow for two separate feeds.

    You can do something similar with compressed CO2 using two needle valves ( if you feed CO2 to both at the same time ) or with two needle valves and solenoids which would allow for completely independent feeds to the tanks.

    -
    S

     
  5. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    I'm using pressurized CO2, DIY is too unstable in my opinion. So buying an extra needle valve would work? How do I connect it to my CO2 system then? And how do I recognize a good needle valve?
     
  6. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    There are a few threads on here about needle valves. I've got one of the ideal ones but that may be overkill for your application. You need a simple manifold for this. Essentially a brass "T" fitting which will provide a way to thread the needle valves into it and connect to the regulator. It may not actually be T shaped but the idea is the same.

    -
    S
     
  7. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    Went to my aquarium shop today and asked if it was possible to add an extra needle valve to my system. He said it is possible but not stable because CO2 always takes the easiest way to get out. Is this true?

    *edit* found this interesting thread: http://socalaquascapers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3125

    I do wonder if a nano tank is worth those expenses. Excel/EasyCarbo might be an easier/cheaper solution?
     
    #7 GillesF, Dec 18, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 19, 2010
  8. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    From all I've read it isn't really an issue so long as you have a decent two stage regulator. TBH, I haven't read much about it with single stage regulators either. I did bring this up to the SuMo regulator guys and they had no issues with either a T fitting after the solenoid and two needle valves or the T fitting after the regulator and two solenoids and two needle valves. I recall they even show one or two of these setups on their site. I could easily see this being a problem with a poor regulator and/or low pressure on the CO2 tank, but only because the regulator wouldn't be able to keep the pressure ahead of the valves stable.

    Put another way, your needle valves are providing a certain size "pipe" restriction to your CO2. If you took a bucket of water with a 1" pipe leading out and put a T on it and then on one leg of the T use say 1/2" pipe and on the other side provide 1/4" ( or even 1/8" ) tubing on it ( with appropriate connectors of course ). The water still flows out both sides of the T until you run low on water in the bucket and the pressure drops.

    This only holds true if there's back pressure on the source. Open up the T fitting on one side to 1" ( or a wide open needle valve with your CO2 system ) and you're probably not going to have any flow on the other side. In all reality this is a problem on any manifold system, break it open so there's no reasonable amount of restriction and the flow to the other outlets pretty much dies. As long as your feed pressure or flow into the manifold is reasonably stable you'll be able to balance it. Make the pressure drift all over the place and you won't really be able to have consistent results. Bottom line here is make sure your tank is full, outlet pressure from the regulator is constant, don't leave one of your valves wide open which if you could you wouldn't need the valve anyway. :)

    -
    S

     
  9. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    Thanks for the info, Shoggoth. It is more clear to me now. I've looked up the SuMo website and found this: http://www.sumoregulator.com/Gallery.html . Is this the T fitting you mean?
    I do not know if I have a single stage or dual stage regulator (shame on me). I do know that single stage regulators can cause a "CO2 dump" as soon as the bottle runs empty but I have never had this problem. In fact, when my bottle is almost empty, the pressure lowers until there's no more CO2 getting out. I have to open the valve completely to get the rest of the CO2 out of the bottle. I wonder if there's a company selling those fittings in Europe/Belgium since we use different sizes. Splitting up my CO2 is definitely something to look into.
     
  10. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Yep, that's pretty much it. You can take this as far as you want to. There's a pretty good pic about halfway down.

    http://socalaquascapers.com/forum/showthread.php?p=35254#post35254

    Prebuilt if you don't want to deal with it yourself.

    http://www.marinedepot.com/6_Outlet_Hexo_Manifold_CO2_Manifolds_for_Aquariums-House_Brand_%28CO2%29-CO3175-FICOMN-vi.html

    The SuMo examples you linked allow completely independent control as each outlet has it's own solenoid and needle valve. You can use a single solenoid and feed the manifold, but then you are looking at an all ON/OFF configuration. Not so bad if you don't need the extra flexibility.

    -
    S


     
  11. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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  12. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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  13. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    You should click on "Onderdelen voor tapinstallaties" (top left, second line) and then picture 3 in the left column. It is a regulator with a T-fitting to produce CO2 for two taps at the same time. It doesn't say if it is a single or dual valve though ...
     
  14. GillesF

    GillesF Subscriber

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    Here's the same type on Ebay.com: http://cgi.ebay.com/2-Product-Beer-Co2-Regulator-Premium-Kegerator-Tap-Keg-/110628195012?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c1f44ac4

    *edit* or these? http://aqmagic.com/store/product_info.php?pName=2-way-t-co2-set-splitter-with-2-free-plastic-bubble-counters&osCsid=821a49913be6cac903e93335f351189f & http://aqmagic.com/store/product_info.php?pName=2-way-brass-co2-splitter&cName=co2-equipment-splitter
     
    #14 GillesF, Dec 26, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2010
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