How to make NO3 and PO4 reference solutions(repost from Left C)

mathman

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Mar 8, 2011
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Thanks left c.

I enjoy learning more about my tank and all the chemistry that's goes along with it...could you please provide a link as to where I can buy graduated cylinders?
 

Tom Barr

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Jan 23, 2005
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US Plastics sells everything plastic including volumetric cylinders. Plastic should be fine and far less breakage and cost than Class A Kymex glass etc.
 

Left C

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Sep 26, 2005
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jerrybforl;76183 said:
What does all of this mean lol??? :confused: Could someone please explain it to me in dumby terms...hehehe
Does Hoppy's explanation help?

Calibrating a test kit means using that kit to measure some water samples with known concentrations of the substance being tested for, and using those test results to verify that the test kit is accurate, or to train yourself to recognize the colors that correspond to the concentrations you want to test for.
 

Left C

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jerrybforl;76220 said:
Not really lol....sorry:confused: I should've paid more attention in chemistry class lol!!!
No need for chemistry. You are just matching colors. Have you ever used an aquarium test kit? If you have, then follow the directions above.
 

jasonevans

Junior Poster
Nov 28, 2011
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Wast curious hlow long you could keep these calibrations on hand, store them where and in what? Or just pitch and do it the next time you want to calibrate, be nice if they could be bought pre made at the LFS. Course I would lose the opputtunity to run all over town looking the accoutrements, could not find test tubes with those cool black rubber stoppers or a test tube rack......
Can't wait to play.....
Thanks Jason in STL
 

Jonathan

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Dec 19, 2012
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Left C;75973 said:
You follow the test kit's direction for testing your aquarium water, if that is what you are testing. If you are testing your tap water, same thing, just follow the directions. Let's call this the sample.

Then the reference solutions are made using "pure" compounds and "pure" water. These give you various color references. Then you compare your sample's color to the reference's color to get an idea of your sample's concentration. It is better to do more than one sample. Do 2 or 3 samples to make sure that the samples are made correctly. If your samples turn out to be different colors, you know that there is an error somewhere. Then you need to find out what is wrong. If all 2 or 3 samples are the same color, you know that either they are made correctly or you made the same, exact error each time.

Make sense?

It would be really nice to have this information on the first page :) I had to hunt it down. Its valuable to less experienced people like myself.
 
Well i made the NO3 solutions, tested them with my NO3 test kit from JBL, and the 50ppm solution gave me a 5ppm on the test kit lol

Or that test kit is severely off or i made an error on the concentrations,

Both 50ppm and 10, 20ppm all give me similiar colours, only 50ppm is somewhat more dense colored..
Gonna make another solution to be sure i didnt get the dosages wrong,

If i use http://rota.la/ calculator, and make a strait 50ppm solution, would it work, isntead of doing the 1000 and 100 solutions?
 

vinzphua

Subscriber
Apr 28, 2015
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Someone asked whether the reference solutions will change colour. The answer is yes. For me, at least. After some time, all my reference solutions became the same colour. It might have to do with the way I stored them.

Sent from my XT1572 using Tapatalk
 

vinzphua

Subscriber
Apr 28, 2015
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Singapore
Right, someone told me my reference solution may have changed colours because I didn't store them in air tight containers.