How to build a Victor VTS253b-320

Left C

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Matt F.;61593 said:
werd DSR bretheren. ;)
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem03/chem03291.htm

looks like an strong oxidizer, which is needed for combustion.
My rule of thumb is to find a regulator that has not been exposed to corrosive gasses. A new corrosive gas regulator, like my SGT 500, is fine. Would I buy a used one...nah. The carbon monoxide regulator was even okay.
Just stay away from toxic and corrosive gasses.
Someone told me that all gases flash out of a regulator body fairly quickly. This means that the ones used with "bad" stuff are usable for our use after a short period of time. This is something that I would not support nor tell people to do this. I just don't fully believe their comment.

This is why, like you, I suggest the same things.

With a regulator with SS diaphragms, one may be more lenient, but I won't tell anyone to do it.
 

soundgy

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Jul 24, 2010
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Thank you so much for this thread! I still don't know what I am doing and too scared to hit the "Buy" button, but I am getting closer. The closer I get to understanding how to accomplish my build, which you have posted a comment about already, I suddenly find myself realizing that I missed an important part. I understand MPT/NPT/FPT fittings now, I think. I can't find any used Victor regulators matching the numbers you have suggested yet, so I might have to buy a new one.

One of my concerns is I will be putting a 20# tank in a room and running low pressure lines to remote tanks. I have been told I need to put the bubble counters and needle valves on the tank end and not the regulator end. Can you confirm if this is an issue or not? I understand the convenience of having the bubble counter next to the tank, but is it really necessary when doing such slow modifications to the BPS settings?

Also, I noticed you commented on "crack pressure" for check valves and "back pressure" on ceramic discs. If I am using manifolds to split the working pressure outlet on my regulator, am I multiplying each "cracking" pressure?

I obviously still have much to learn and don't mind doing the legwork and research, but I feel I have kind of stumbled and need a point in the right direction.

Any help you can provide, even search terms, I would appreciate it greatly.

Thanks,

Matt
 

Matt F.

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soundgy;62505 said:
Thank you so much for this thread! I still don't know what I am doing and too scared to hit the "Buy" button, but I am getting closer. The closer I get to understanding how to accomplish my build, which you have posted a comment about already, I suddenly find myself realizing that I missed an important part. I understand MPT/NPT/FPT fittings now, I think. I can't find any used Victor regulators matching the numbers you have suggested yet, so I might have to buy a new one.

One of my concerns is I will be putting a 20# tank in a room and running low pressure lines to remote tanks. I have been told I need to put the bubble counters and needle valves on the tank end and not the regulator end. Can you confirm if this is an issue or not? I understand the convenience of having the bubble counter next to the tank, but is it really necessary when doing such slow modifications to the BPS settings?

Also, I noticed you commented on "crack pressure" for check valves and "back pressure" on ceramic discs. If I am using manifolds to split the working pressure outlet on my regulator, am I multiplying each "cracking" pressure?

I obviously still have much to learn and don't mind doing the legwork and research, but I feel I have kind of stumbled and need a point in the right direction.

Any help you can provide, even search terms, I would appreciate it greatly.

Thanks,

Matt

Hi, Matt-

Glad this thread has helped a bit. In your situation, I would run a "D" gauge regulator, a single solenoid, and multiple needle valves. Fabco is comming out with an inexpensive 1/8" npt version of their NV-55 unit, which would be great on a manifold type set-up.

The needle valve can be connected to the manifold, which is connected to the solenoid and regulator.
Run co2 resistant (pressure resistant) lines to each tank. I use ADA glass bubble counters on the tank side to:
1) insure that gas is flowing
2) eyeball how much gas is entering my tanks.

With the dropchecker/bubble counter combo, you can easily get into the ballpark and keep an eye on things as the system ages. The drop checker is a good diagnostic tool for the health of your co2 system. Is teh gas going where it needs to go and at the correct speed? You can answer this question with a bubble counter. I'd stay away from JBJs. I had one fail. Check valve went out. An in-line like the ADA is teh way to go, imo.

I'd also buy new if you can. Fewer headaches. There is no real way to tell how well an ebay used regulator performs prior to buying it and testing it.

With a new regulator, all the questions are answered. The unit works and it is in perfect condition. You are covered by a manufacturer's warranty to boot. Why build/invest in a shaky foundation (used regulator) when you can afford a new one?

If you need part numbers or places to buy a new regulator, just let me know.

If you are running more than one tank, I would consider getting a regulator with a C, D, E gauge rather than an A or B.
 

BeachBum2012

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Feb 22, 2011
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Quick question for you fine folks.

I just bought a 7-0155 like the one in post #77. That builds just like the VTS253 model right?

I'm hoping I can get this guy up and running soon and I'd be completely lost if it wasn't for reading through the threads here for the last couple of weeks. You guys are great.

Thanks,
Brian
 

Left C

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BeachBum2012;62951 said:
... I'm tinking about going a slightly different route using a Clippard Mouse and Vabco valve. Any thoughts on a setup like that?

I haven't used a Clippard mouse solenoid. I wouldn't use the mouse because they have the tiny #10-32 threads. Whatever screws into it can easily be broken off. If you are more careful than me, you could make the #10-32 Fabco and the #10-32 mouse work.

Clippard does have 2021 high flow mouse solenoids that have 1/8" NPT ports, but I think that they are 3-way solenoids. They retail for around $25. Some could be two way. My catalog is old and the web site isn't very detailed. You may want to call Clippard and ask them if they are 2-way or 3-way and if they have 1/8" NPT intake and exhaust ports. You might be able to make the 3-way mouse work. You could ask.
 

BeachBum2012

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I did do a little more research and I think I'm going to go with the Burkett and the new Fabco valve with the 1/8" NPT ports when it comes out for now. I've still got a few idea running around for those little mouse valves though. When I come up with something I'll be sure to post it up here.

Thanks again.
 

Left C

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That's good that you are going with the 1/8" threads.

I've broken quite a few #10-32 parts during a very short period of time that I got away from them. It's almost like trying to connect two or three parts together with a cooked spaghetti noodle and not breaking it when you move it around. It takes a good bit of "beef" to break 1/8" parts. Or, in my case ... it's "pork."
 

BeachBum2012

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Yeah. I deal with easy to break stuff all day at work. I want this to be fun time.

That mouse valves just looks so cool. Its really too bad they don't make one with NPT ports.
 

Left C

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BeachBum2012;62998 said:
... That mouse valves just looks so cool. Its really too bad they don't make one with NPT ports.
I did mention to you that the model 2021 has 1/8" NPT ports in post #72.
 

Matt F.

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Left C;62995 said:
That's good that you are going with the 1/8" threads.

I've broken quite a few #10-32 parts during a very short period of time that I got away from them. It's almost like trying to connect two or three parts together with a cooked spaghetti noodle and not breaking it when you move it around. It takes a good bit of "beef" to break 1/8" parts. Or, in my case ... it's "pork."



LOOL! bring the noodles out!
 

BeachBum2012

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Left C;63000 said:
I did mention to you that the model 2021 has 1/8" NPT ports in post #72.

I just checked that one out. Its a bit confusing. Maybe I'll get one just to mess with and see if I can get it working.
 

Matt F.

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Project SGT(2):
Picked this one up from a good friend:
SGT2001.jpg


SGT2002.jpg


SGT2003.jpg


SGT2004.jpg


This is how you can tell if it's a stainless regulator (see back of gauges):
SGT2005.jpg


Ready for a build my way (all kosher/stainless and clean):
SGT2006.jpg


I'm going to replace these gauges with stainless center gauges.
SGT2007.jpg