How to build a Victor VTS253b-320

reybie

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Aug 30, 2010
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Matt F.;61288 said:
That looks like it could be an older model number. Could be that Victor doesn't make it anymore. It's single stage regulator, so you won't get the benefits of a dual stage (constant output/working pressure as your tank pressure drops, etc.).

It's better quality than aquarium regulators, though. It's prob even better quality than what most are selling. The reason they don't go with victor, matheson, etc is that they can't make any money off of them. The material cost is so much,

So, if you want to convert it to CO2, I don't see a problem. Buy any normal 1/4" npt cga 320 nut/nipple (stem) fitting and that should work. If it's a large version with enough clearance, you can go with a shorter nipple.

Thanks, I will bring it to the regulator repair here and get me that cga nut and nipple. I also have one of the dual stage regs with the fine thread inlet port. Thanks to the pics in the previous post I will know what I'm looking for. I think I will save the shipping charge and pay for gas to bring it to Phoenix and have it fitted there.

Now, I need to shop around for a solenoid.
 

reybie

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Aug 30, 2010
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Good news and bad news, I got the Fisher Scientific the new fine thread inlet (installed) but the guy said I won't get enough pressure for the Victor 360A, I didn't elaborate that I was going to use it for an aquarium though.
 

Left C

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reybie;61356 said:
Good news and bad news, I got the Fisher Scientific the new fine thread inlet (installed) but the guy said I won't get enough pressure for the Victor 360A, I didn't elaborate that I was going to use it for an aquarium though.

What is the pressure range shown on the low pressure ugauge? 0 to what? Is it listed as psi, psig, or what? There are usually two two pressure ranges shown on each gauge.
 

reybie

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Aug 30, 2010
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Left C;61430 said:
It goes up to 30 psi which should work fine. 0 to 30 and 0 to 60 psi working pressure ranges are the most popular "for aquarium use."

Thanks! I'm going to change out the stem and nut and give it a try.
 

Left C

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reybie;61452 said:
Thanks! I'm going to change out the stem and nut and give it a try.

It all depends on how much resistance that you will have. I can run 2 Clippard check valves with a ceramic disc diffuser using a regulator that has a 0 to 30 psi low pressure gauge. I set it on 15 psi and let it rip.

Some check valves and diffusers require more pressure to operate than what I used above.

You can add up the cracking pressure of the check valve(s) with how much pressure that is required to operate your diffusing method to get a good idea of the operating range needed.
 

reybie

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pat w;61466 said:
I've allways been told to shy away from reg's that have been used with flamables (acetylene in this case). Is that not so?
Pat

What was the reasoning behind it? It would be nice to know for future reference :)
 

pat w

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Never really asked till now. I can't remember who or when. I just remember being told reg's previously using CO2, O2, inerts (Nitrogen and such), and nobles (Helium, Argon, etc.) were all OK - volitiles were not. Most likely the remote possibility of a pocket of the gas remaining in the reg and the hazard it posed. LeftC, any illumination here. And I fully understand the liability pickle jar I've opened here - sorry.

Pat
 

Left C

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reybie;61467 said:
pat w;61466 said:
I've allways been told to shy away from reg's that have been used with flamables (acetylene in this case). Is that not so?

Pat
What was the reasoning behind it? It would be nice to know for future reference :)
As a general rule, I would not use any regulator that has been used with a toxic gas. Flammable gas is toxic as far as I'm concerned.

New regulators built for a toxic gas shouldn't pose a problem if the other specs are inline.

If a regulator has stainless steel diaphragms, it may be OK because the gas flashes off of it rather quickly. Anwar had some Victor HPT272's for sale a while back. These can be used with flammable gases, but I don't know if they were or not.

These are just my general rules that I go by. I've never used a regulator that has been used with a flammable gas or a toxic gas. So, I just have no experience with them to go into any more detail.
 

Left C

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pat w;61468 said:
Never really asked till now. I can't remember who or when. I just remember being told reg's previously using CO2, O2, inerts (Nitrogen and such), and nobles (Helium, Argon, etc.) were all OK - volitiles were not. Most likely the remote possibility of a pocket of the gas remaining in the reg and the hazard it posed. LeftC, any illumination here. And I fully understand the liability pickle jar I've opened here - sorry.

Pat

I just saw this post, Pat. I am not liable either. These are random thoughts because you asked. I have not done any testing on this matter and I still do not recommend using any regulators that were used with flammable gases.

Concerning the pocket of gas left in it; you could just install the CGA-320 nut and nipple on the regulator and then connect it to your CO2 cylinder. Open the cylinder and regulator so that any residuals are blown out.

Like I mentioned, SS diaphragm models may work, but I don't know. Also, concerning regulators' diaphragms made with other materials; I don't know how or if there is any bonding like hydrogen bonding, Van Der Waals forces or any other force involved that may keep the gas from completely flashing off.

There are so many regulators that we can use that I would not even bother with these flammable gas regulators.
 

rockhoe14er

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i got a victor two stage regulator that was once used for hydrogen. I ended up just getting it rebuilt and it works like a charm. From what i have researched the problem with hydrogen regulators is that hydrogen is a corrosive gas to some of the rubber parts in the regulator so if you get a second hand one you will probably have to rebuild it.
 
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Matt F.

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I built a regulator that was used with carbon monoxide...lol
Oxygen is flammable/explosive.

Generally I agree with Left C on this issue. Just use common sense. When in doubt, check to see what the regulator is used for by looking up the CGA fitting.

Common sense.
 

Matt F.

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I just picked up these babies:
1-28-11010.jpg


1-28-11013.jpg


1-28-11014.jpg


All ready for CO2
 

Left C

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Matt F.;61492 said:
... Oxygen is flammable/explosive. ....
Oxygen supports combustion, but pure oxygen doesn't burn. It is non-reactive when kept by itself. It does support the burning of other substances. As we know, mix it with acetylene, gasoline, hydrogen, etc and you can get quite a bang. It is really classified as an accelerator.

Since oxygen isn't a poisonous gas at all, I would recommend using an O2 regulator for our use if its pressure specs are in our range.
 

Matt F.

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Left C;61578 said:
Oxygen supports combustion, but pure oxygen doesn't burn. It is non-reactive when kept by itself. It does support the burning of other substances. As we know, mix it with acetylene, gasoline, hydrogen, etc and you can get quite a bang. It is really classified as an accelerator.

Since oxygen isn't a poisonous gas at all, I would recommend using an O2 regulator for our use if its pressure specs are in our range.

werd DSR bretheren. ;)
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem03/chem03291.htm

looks like an strong oxidizer, which is needed for combustion.
My rule of thumb is to find a regulator that has not been exposed to corrosive gasses. A new corrosive gas regulator, like my SGt 500, is fine. Would I buy a used one...nah. The carbon monoxide regulaor was even okay.
Just stay away from toxic and corrosive gasses.
 
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