This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.
  1. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
    Dismiss Notice

growing problem

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by bary_g, Sep 6, 2008.

  1. bary_g

    bary_g Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    1:50 PM
    hi everyone,
    I purchased that plant and have problems growing it. I have no idea wheather the lighting is too bright/too dark?


    [​IMG]

    thanks for your help.
    Regards,
    Bartek
     
  2. Gerryd

    Gerryd Plant Guru Team
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    5,623
    Likes Received:
    18
    Local Time:
    1:50 PM
    Hi,

    We also have no idea as you did not give us any information other than that you have a problem :)

    Please provide basic some info such as:

    Tank size
    type and duration of lighting
    substrate
    do you use c02 or fertilization
    filtration
    etc.
     
  3. bary_g

    bary_g Junior Poster

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    1:50 PM
    Oh, forgot to mention additional info. so, its 30 gal tank, 65W 10000K with a time of lighting of 10hrs. haggen ladder, no fish, plain gravel mixed with sand and some liquid fertilizer being added once a month. I've noticed that the lower parts of the plants which are a little shaded are green and sound so maybe it needs little less of the light?
    thanks Gerry
     
  4. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,011
    Likes Received:
    89
    Local Time:
    1:50 PM
    The only thing that would make your light too bright is algae growth. Other than that, having very high light intensity just drives the plants to grow faster. You say you add "some liquid fertilizer" once a month. No matter what the liquid fertilizer is, you are not adding it nearly often enough.

    All plants, whether terrestrial or aquatic, need nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous, plus a mix of "trace elements" like iron, boron, etc. in order to grow. These elements must be added as fertilizer. Plants also all need carbon in abundance, since plants are made up primarily of carbon. We usually add CO2 as a source of that carbon, but Seachem Excel is another such source, and in low light tanks, the substrate can provide enough carbon to support the very slow growth those tanks have.

    You need to do some research on fertilizing and on keeping planted tanks in general. This, http://www.barrreport.com/you-new-aquatic-plants-start-here/3009-newbies-please-read-1st.html, is a good place to start, plus reading some of the other threads in that forum.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice