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Growing Crypts And Hygrophila Araguaia In Sand??

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by rs18alpha, May 27, 2018.

  1. rs18alpha

    rs18alpha Subscriber

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    I'd like to try a new set up with lava rocks and sand. Behind the lava rocks I'll be using some type of aqua soil for the back plants. I want to try sand in the front of the tank.

    I'd like to plant some crypts and hygrophila araguaia in the sand but I don't know if they will do well in sand??
    I'm hoping I can do this. The crypts will hide the rocks in front and make a seamless transition from front to rear.

    I'll be using a Twinstar 900s led- Co2- and EI dosing.

    Thanks every one!!
     
    Mike k likes this.
  2. burr740

    burr740 Micros Spiller
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    They will both do fine in plain sand if there's plenty of nutrients in the water
     
  3. rs18alpha

    rs18alpha Subscriber

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    Thanks burr740, I was hoping they would do well.
     
  4. Allwissend

    Allwissend Article Editor
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    Of course burr is correct, if you give all they need in the water column they will grow without issues. I just wanted to add 2 things:
    • in my experience H. "Araguia" likes to have a good deal of space to itself so do not plant too dense
    • test all sand before use - large amount of sand in a small volume of RO water, test for TDS, KH and GH increase. Some increase might be okay but keep in mind CO2 accelerates the process. Nothing is more frustrating than discovering that the "inert sand" leaches great amount of GH and KH after you finished scaping and planting.
     
  5. rs18alpha

    rs18alpha Subscriber

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    I asked this question today in another post. Maybe you have an opinion?
    I wanted to try some brown sand. I found Exoterra riverbed sand brown aquatic terrarium substrate.

    Do you think this would be ok to use?
     
  6. Allwissend

    Allwissend Article Editor
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    I don't know if it is okay for aquarium use. As long as it doesn't dissolve in water works fine. Most sands are fine and I don't see anything to make me suspicious.

    If you have the substrate already:
    • Get some distilled water or use RO water. Test TDS. Add a lot of sand and just enough water to the container to be able to take a tds reading without touching the sand. TDS should remain about the same overnight.
    • Add HCl, vinegar or concentrated vinegar directly on top of some substrate. There should be no fizzing. Fizzing means the substrate has carbonates and will increase your KH (possibly also your GH).
    • Add HCl, vinegar or concentrated vinegar to the water. Test TDS. The TDS should remain about the same --- this is to test if there are loosely bound metals in the substrate, low pH <5 will generally make them soluble.
    Maybe somebody has more hands on experience with it and sees this post.
     
  7. rs18alpha

    rs18alpha Subscriber

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    Sounds good, Thanks for the info. Someone suggested I try ada colorado sand. I'll go with that.
     
  8. tiger15

    tiger15 Member

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    Why is it an issue leaking gH and kH. gH is a source of Ca and Mg plants need. kH is carbonate that helps buffer pH drop from CO2 injection. I use dolomite gravel and save me from adding Equilibrium.
     
  9. Allwissend

    Allwissend Article Editor
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    Hi @tiger15
    Most here like to have control of their water parameters and leaking soil does not allow that to a good degree of precision. The OP already said that he will use aquasoil, thus sand that increases the KH kind of defeats one purpose of aquasoil. Some invertebrates, fish and (rare) plants prefer to have a low KH. Having a neutral soil allows you to play with water as you like without the need to take down the aquarium and change the soil.

    Plus, with injected CO2, soils keep dissolving creating very high GH and KH. I had such a sand. Some soils containing CaCO3 may be more "docile" as you say, however you can just add crushed coral to your filter and get the same results with the added benefit that you see when it is gone.

    Some years back most people were only able to test for pH, so it became a pseudo indicator for many things. You still hear people saying you have to have so and so pH for this fish or that plant, when actually the success of the species is determined by KH. With injected CO2 we became able to lower pH without altering KH and so we could see that many plants and fish survive and multiply in pH>6. Not saying pH does not have any (indirect)influence (nutrients, etc.), but it is not as vital to keep the pH buffered at 7 as once though.
     
    DeepMetropolis likes this.
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