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Going Dutch with Aquasoil

Discussion in 'Aquascaping' started by Pikez, Apr 23, 2015.

  1. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    They don't talk about aquatic plants at all. So some of it will not apply. Submersion is a game-changer. Mostly, that affects CO2 and light to a lesser degree.

    But what a plant needs in terms of nutrients other than water and CO2, is not dramatically different. Big section of this book has to do with pathogens and effects of global warming etc. But about half the book may be tangentially relevant to all of us.

    Don't expect me to provide a Cliff notes summary any time soon. :)
     
  2. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    On page 742, it says Pantanal won't grow if you stare at it too long.
     
    rzn7z7, slipfinger, fablau and 2 others like this.
  3. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    A state of magical bliss - that light, CO2, hardness, pH, and nutrient level that makes all plants grow - that makes all plants grow. We won't find it anytime soon. But pot growers in Colorado may get there first.

    I'll guess that lower light, low to moderate CO2, soft water with KH of 3 or less is a good starting point. Nutrient wise, given my pretty crappy tap water, that is probably somewhere between Seachem Flourish and full EI. Most of us would fall somewhere in that spectrum, depending on a dozen variables. When it comes to Nitrogen, EI is not excessive. If you decide to back off on EI and work down the spectrum towards Seachem Flourish, you're likely going to run out of nitrates or you'll need to feed your fish a lot more.
     
    deepgreen likes this.
  4. deepgreen

    deepgreen Member

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    Yes, should have not said that. No ferts, no growth. I may try to plant them in the soil and add some root tabs. Maybe I am just too impatient with them and should tend to them better. I let things grow high up and the Anubias gets overgrown all the time.
     
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  5. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    Trimming Pantanal: yank, line up the tops, cut diagonally, stick back in the ground.

    IMG_7298.jpg

    IMG_7299.jpg
     
  6. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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  7. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Junior Poster

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    That's a good idea! I never thought of cutting that way in those images above!
    Well now ill just have to try that out myself.
     
  8. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    Acmella repens, waiting patiently in the backyard, to be let back into the Dutch. Getting hard to resist.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    Reliable as always...Rotala wallichii Maka Red in the Dutch.

    CO2-related tip stunting does NOT look like this. With CO2 issues, you often see a gradual decrease in leaf size. With nutrient or environment-induced stunting, you see 'swollen nodes' like you do here, along with jagged fraying of the fine leaves.

    When you've unwittingly or deliberately stunted as many plants as I have, you pick up on these things.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #1689 Pikez, Aug 13, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
    burr740 likes this.
  10. rajkm

    rajkm Lifetime Members
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    I had said earlier That I had stunted Maka and Wallichii in my garage, same signs as yours, and it eventually expanded to Red Cross, Mexicana red and butterfly. All have recovered and I have 3-4 stems with good tops.
    Water change to bring the parameters back to normal helped.

    So the things that I did wrong with last water change was, added K from Potassium Bicarbonate, increased KH also due to that (started at 4 KH, ended at 3, regularly used to be 1 KH), added chloride from using KCL in my GH Booster.
     
  11. Pikez

    Pikez Rotala Killer!
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    With tap water at KH1, where you are in the northwest, you don't need to mess with it at all. At least, not to grow Rotala and Ammannia. They love that water. There was a time, 20 years ago, when I briefly toyed with the idea of moving to the northwest just because everything I wanted to grow loved soft water.

    Excess K, excess chloride, and possibly excess carbonates could all be potential causes for these plants stunting.

    I would not add Potassium Chloride to any tank when it is so easy to get all the potassium your plants need from other safer sources. All the K your plants need is in KNO3. The ratio of potassium to nitrate in KNO3 is such that you provide plants with more K than they could possibly consume.

    I'm going to go out on a limb and say this: if anyone feels their plants do better by adding K2SO4 in addition to KNO3, they are imagining it. Or the tank was sulfur deficient that the K2SO4 provided.
     
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