Glosso, Low Light, Dry Start

belladee

Junior Poster
Mar 7, 2009
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I have been reading about this for a few days and I just want to make sure that I have this all straight before I get started.

I have a 75 gallon. I have 2x54w T5HO lights. 1 actinic and 1 6500k. (I got the actinic for the fish color)

I am going to use either make it yourself mineralized substrate but more likely eco complete.

So here is my understanding...

-I put the substrate in.. /I do not need to fertalize the substrate/

-I seperate the glosso into 8-10 steams..

-plant a few inches apart..

-cover the tank with plastic wrap /leave a small opening/

-mist 2x a day with tank water that is treated with liquid ferts

-turn on lights for 12 hrs a day

-wait 3 to 4 weeks

-add water to tank and many stem plants

-treat with liquid excel for a while

-add fish

OK...
- Is ANY of that wrong?

-Will it work with my lighing set up in the long run?

-How long do I need to add the excel for?

-Would I have better luck with HC instead of glosso with my lighting? (I choose glosso because of the larger leaves)

Thanks so much for the input
Lori

PS-If anyone knows where I can buy glosso let me know, I havent found any for sale yet
 

VaughnH

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Is that a 48 inch long tank? If so, don't you mean 54 watt T5HO lights?

It only takes two 54 watt T5HO lights, where each bulb has its own reflector, to light a 48" 75 gallon tank with high light.

If you mean the 4 pin 65 watt PC bulbs, then two of them will also give enough light for a 75 gallon 48 inch long tank, but with a poor distribution of the light over the substrate, with the bulbs mounted end to end.

You get the best results, in my opinion, if you cut the glosso into tiny plantlets, each with 2 leaves, and either plant them individually with tweezers, or just spread them out uniformly on top of the substrate. Keep the water level just below the top of the substrate, cover the tank with plastic wrap, leaving a small opening for fresh air, and don't mist them at all.

It is helpful to fertilize the substrate first, using terrestrial plant food, dosed per the manufacturers recommendations. By the time the glosso is ready to be flooded, the ammonia in the fertilizers should all be converted to NO3.

HC should work the same way. I'm sure there are other good ways to do this, but this way does work for sure.
 

belladee

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Mar 7, 2009
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VaughnH;34765 said:
It only takes two 54 watt T5HO lights, where each bulb has its own reflector, to light a 48" 75 gallon tank with high light.

So this is concidered high light? I was told it is low to medium light? I do not plan on using CO2.
 

VaughnH

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belladee;34801 said:
So this is concidered high light? I was told it is low to medium light? I do not plan on using CO2.
It is high enough to need CO2 so the plants can grow at the rate they are driven to grow at by the light. It isn't as high an intensity as has been considered high light, but many people have reported that they can grow most of the high light plants, including ground cover plants, if they use that plus CO2. And, that was actually using one 54 watt light over a 55 gallon tank, which is the same height. The second tube just gives you better coverage of the substrate, and adds some more intensity.
 

belladee

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Mar 7, 2009
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well I was planning on using excel for the 1st few weeks as suggested for this dry start method but then weaning off once established.

It was my understanding that with the method no CO2 was needed for the long run.

So, corect me if im wrong, but what you are saying is that because of the higher intensity of my lighting (2x54W HO) I would need to continue CO2 forever.

SO.... the dry start method is only good for low light situations? Ill have to go back and read more. I was under the impression that this method would work for low to high light. But I also thought that I had low light.
 

SuperColey1

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Feb 17, 2007
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The method works for any level of light.

It is once you put the water on top after it has grown you then have lost the high concentration of CO2 that the plants were taking from the air when they were emersed.

At this point lighting dictates wether CO2 is needed and in your case I would suggest you are in the pressurised level (high light)

AC
 

belladee

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Mar 7, 2009
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considering that one of my bubls are actinic would that still be considered high light?

Ok so if yes, i need CO2 and dont mist the plants... other than that, everything I have listed is correct?

Is it also correct that aquasoil is the prefered soil for this method. Would it work just as well with ecocomplete or flourite or even DIY mineralized soil?
 

SuperColey1

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Feb 17, 2007
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I have no idea on the substrate. I grow my emersed plants in plain old cheapest I can find compost in windowsill propogators. lol

AC
 

belladee

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Mar 7, 2009
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Im changing the subject here a bit but now since I am going to have high light I have been looking at different plants. Plants that I wanted but didnt think I could have. I am going to add CO2

With my lighting and CO2 would I be able to grow such plants as...
Cabomba furcata and Pogostemon stellata?

Or would I need more light?
 

VaughnH

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Once you have enough CO2 - 30+ ppm, and the same every day during the photoperiod, you can grow almost all plants, with the light intensity determining how fast they grow. CO2 is at least as important as light intensity.
 

belladee

Junior Poster
Mar 7, 2009
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well i ordered the substrate, 7 bags of eco and the plants HC and glosso. The lights are set to go and I decided to add the CO2.

My handy husband said he will help me set it up and he can get free CO2 from his job so ill start this in about a week.

Im a bit nervous, I hope I dont kill the plants!

maybe ill do a little journal on here so I can get input along the way.