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Found (One) Cause of Dying RCS

Discussion in 'Inverts' started by gsjmia, Feb 24, 2017.

  1. gsjmia

    gsjmia Lifetime Members
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    A couple of months ago, all my RCS died, I just assumed it was something in the water that was killing them, so I gave up.


    All the time the amanos did well.


    I decided to give RCS another try so I bought 20 Sakura Fire Red Cherry Shrimp and they started slowly dying and no fry production


    I remembered what an old shrimp guy in Ft. Lauderdale had told me, that just one copper penny in one of his giant shrimp tubs would wipe them out.


    I remembered that I had used a brass fitting for the reactor to connect the co2 hose.


    [​IMG]


    So I removed the brass fitting and reconnected using the Rex Griggs method.


    [​IMG]


    Not only did they stop dying, they were more active and within a week there were tons of baby RCS all over.


    God it feels good to actually and really solve something.


    [​IMG]
     
  2. fablau

    fablau rotalabutterfly.com
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    Ah ah! That happened to me as well probably, and now I can finally understand why! I used to use copper connects in my Co2 loop tubing, and I remember at that time my RCS started dying and I lost all of them... that's why! Good thing to remember. Thanks for sharing this!


    Also, when I used to dose high traces in my tank with low water changes (something like 0.5 ppm Fe from CSM per week with just 2 water changes a month), Cu probably accumulated too much and RCS population reduced a big deal, and I almost never saw them around. Once reduced dosing and increased WC to once a week, they started wandering around more and back into breeding. And similarly to your experience, Amanos were just fine. It looks like RCS are much more sensitive to Cu than Amanos.
     
  3. Jason King

    Jason King barrreport.com
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    Very interesting and makes sense, thanks for posting.


    Saying that I've not had the same thing happen here with my brass fittings that I've used with my cerges reactor for over two years now.


    http://www.barrreport.com/forum/barr-report/articles-aa/219617-how-to-build-a-cerges-co2-reactor


    RCS & Tiger Shrimp have all reproduced and I now have alot more than I started with.


    I'm wondering if the quality of the fittings make a difference? Cheap fitting less copper more zinc etc..? 
     
  4. Christophe

    Christophe Subscriber
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    Consider also your tap water. There may already be quite a bit in it, which when added to a brass fitting here, a little in some micro-fert there, might begin to add up. LD50 for copper is pretty high, but over time, I think you'd come to notice the impact of say, LD2.
     
  5. gsjmia

    gsjmia Lifetime Members
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    I had my tank water tested at Clemson and the Cu is less than .01ppm but the Na was 42ppm and the Cl was 62ppm. I live in South Florida and salt water intrusion is always in the news, so I switched to 100% RO and they still kept dying. After a couple of weeks, the next thing I did was remove the brass fitting and within a week it all turned around RCS-wise.


    I was hoping to get a big boost in the plants by eliminating the sodium, but nothing happened. I will eventually go back to 50/50 RO and tap.


    FYI, you can get a pretty good water analysis for $25, plus postage, from Clemson through this place, just print out the order form and mail:

    Code:
    https://www.cropking.com/training-and-education/how-submit-leaf-and-water-analysis
    The results are usually within 48 hours of reciept.


    The funny thing is my API 2 month old test kit said my No3 was 40-80 ppm (shades of reddish orange) and the analysis says 2ppm (am I reading it right?)


    Below is an example of what I got--at the time my gh was 4 and kh was 4. Most of the results don't mean much to me, I have to look up what is within a good range--is there a list anywhere of the normal ranges for each of these elements?


    : [​IMG]
     
    #5 gsjmia, Feb 25, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 25, 2017
    2 people like this.
  6. Christophe

    Christophe Subscriber
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    Really good to know, thanks for the tip!
     
  7. burr740

    burr740 Micros Spiller
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    Thanks for the link!
     
  8. fablau

    fablau rotalabutterfly.com
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    That may be Jason. I have copper pipes in my home, and never had problems with them... but a couple of probably" cheap" brass fittings caused similar issues in my tank. Got rid of those, and shrimp came back. The high-trace dosing is another issue, but I really killen my entire population because of that. So... be careful with high traces, low CEC substrates and shrimp!
     
  9. fablau

    fablau rotalabutterfly.com
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    Nice link for a cheap water testing service, I am wondering though if it is reliable enough... I mean, 2 ppm vs 10-20 ppm of No3 puzzles me... can they be wrong? Or can your test kit be that off? Who to trust?
     
  10. gsjmia

    gsjmia Lifetime Members
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    I think I trust Clemson's lab equipment a lot more than a $15 API test kit. The API color chart asks you to distinguish between 2 or 3 shades of yellow and 5 shades of orange or red. Plus, the color changes if you look at the vial from the side or down the tube over a piece of white paper. Who knows, maybe I fat fingered that particular test. Now that I think of it, I generally use it only to determine (a) the presence of No3; and (b) whether there is too much.


    I am trying this recipe for remineralizing RO: http://www.theplantedtank.co.uk/RO.htm. I plan to re-test again in a week or two to see what the Ca, Mg and sodium is with the remineralized RO. I also now have several new Hanna test kits (but no No3), so I'll check all of them against Clemson then.
     
    #10 gsjmia, Feb 25, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 25, 2017
  11. fablau

    fablau rotalabutterfly.com
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    Sounds good! Keep us posted, thanks.
     
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