Forced Emersion?

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csmith

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Can you force emersion on a plant? If you simply drop the water level below the tops of the leaves and leave it that way for an extended period of time, will the plant adapt to this or will it cause bad things to happen? I know they can grow that way, but it's a little different when they do it themselves versus you simply taking away some of the water. Just one of those gee whiz questions.
 
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CL_

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Sure they'll grow. It happens in nature all of the time when water level drops down in the dry season, etc.
 

jonny_ftm

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If you live in a humid area, no problem. Otherwise, it will dry. In areas with a +70% moisture, they will emerge spontaneously
 

Philosophos

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Some plants emerse with less than 70% humidity. I've seen Ludwigia and Bacopa both do it in my own tanks. The Ludwigia flowered.

Others will get to the top, form a mat, and then shed every single leaf down the stem.

Bryophytes will often enough crawl right up out of the water if they've got a surface to grow on.

Be sure you read up on the plant before you let it grow above the waterline. There's definitely some varied reactions.
 

jonny_ftm

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What specie of Ludwigia you got emerged that way please? And what's your ambient humidity where you live? Here, I'm between 40-60% depending on season, and my Ludwigia repens never did it in ambient air.
 

shoggoth43

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My swords don't survive either. The leaves brown and curl up all crispy once they break the surface. The leaves underwater are still fine.

-
S
 

Philosophos

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jonny_ftm;48981 said:
What specie of Ludwigia you got emerged that way please? And what's your ambient humidity where you live? Here, I'm between 40-60% depending on season, and my Ludwigia repens never did it in ambient air.

It was repens, and that was a few years ago when I was just starting out. The flower was close to the surface, so it's possible that the humidity was high enough just above the water line to do the job.
 

Biollante

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Why Yes

Hi Jonny, All,

I have Ludwigia arcuata and Ludwigia brevipes growing emerged. Ludwigia brevipes, I think grows better emerged than submersed, for me anyway.

The answer to the original question is yes. Usually if you look at the places the plants grow emerged in the wild, will give a good indication of the conditions required.

I have read that Ludwigia repens can be grown emerged; I have not had any success. My guess is Ludwigia repens, being a Florida plant would need high humidity conditions, I may try again the same way I emerge Swords.

There are dozens of species of Ludwigia all over North America.

Biollante
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Wet

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Flood that weak emergent growth so those stems get strong for when evaporation gives them another chance to go emergent and you'll be fine. I've grown L. repens 'Rubin' (which has HUGE leaves emergent) and am currently starting L. 'Guinea' emergent this way. I use a DIY fogger in my paludarium and used sealed tanks in the past but can do this in Los Angeles's 60-70% humidity. Remember plants are tough and can do most anything if you give them time to adjust.
 
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csmith

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You're welcome Biollante, you're welcome. :p

Thanks guys, for all the responses. Like I said at the beginning this was just one of those questions I had kicking around and was curious about.
 

Biollante

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Ultra-Sonic Humidifiers

Hi,

For those of us that live in the land of 7% relative humidity and sub freezing dew points domes or containers are about it for most of the tropical stuff, even with misters I find that humidifiers are often required. :gw

Biollante
 
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csmith

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I had a thought (uh oh). Lets say you have a glass top on an aquarium. If you drop the water level 4-5 inches in the aquarium would that then hold the relative humidity necessary, or would it release too much given holes for plumbing, etc?
 

Biollante

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Yes?

Hi,

Yes, to both. :p

Yes, that is one method; in the dry places we live, it can be tricky. Remember you still require a reasonable amount of airflow, but I know how to cheat that one. :)

The simplest method (well there is one simpler, but people make odd and sometimes scary noises when I mention it), is a piece of glass or Plexiglas or Saran Wrap over the top, make sure it reasonably seals and simply open the top a couple of times a day. A hinged arrangement usually works best. To do it right, optic quality material or something that does not mess with the quality of the light passing through. :gw

It will still be necessary to spray or lightly mist the plants. Good surface agitation helps an air pump with a high quality, glass air stone or diffuser comes in handy here, an airlock or even a check valve that allows air out, well then, Bob’s your uncle, you have a paludarium. :cool:

Biollante