Fire Extinguisher Co2

hoejay

Junior Poster
Aug 23, 2007
2
0
1
Hi,

RE: fire extinguishers as a source of Co2.

It is realatively easy for me to get hold of an unused fire extinguisher and replace the spent extinguisher when required.

I am unsure if the refilling of an unknown cylinder without exchange (see question below) is very easy here in the uk. I understand that an original fire extinguisher requires cvylinder testing evey 5yrs after it has reached 10 years from manufacture but also requires a visual yearly inspection. But as I understand it the filling of any cylinder is down to the discression of the filler.

Question - Do I need to modify the extinguisher valve from a squeeze trigger to a wheel type valve or can I simply control flow to the regulator by controling the amount the trigger is squeezed?

Regards,

Neil
 

punky

Junior Poster
Feb 24, 2007
19
0
1
You need to change the 'head' from a squeeze handle type to a screw (wheel) valve type like those used in welding. Then you need a CO2 regulator and a needle valve for fine tuning.

Hope this helps :)
 

bobtail

Prolific Poster
May 18, 2007
35
0
6
58
Wirral NW england
Or using the correct fitting and regulator you can have the handle squeezed all the time and regulated down via the regulator and switched off via a solenoid
 

hoejay

Junior Poster
Aug 23, 2007
2
0
1
I was concerned at the initial high flow rate to the regulator from depressing the trigger.

My question really was - can and /or does the trigger need to be depressed "slowly" to realease the gas into the regulator initially at a controlled rate.

i.e. will depressing the trigger too fast cause freezing and / or draw liquid gas into the regulator?

Would this mean that regulator would need more maintenance / early replacement thus negating any savings on gas source.

I would be interested to here any long term users comments regards reliability
 

VaughnH

Lifetime Charter Member
Lifetime Member
Jan 24, 2005
3,011
94
48
85
Sacramento, CA
The answer about the regulator is going to depend on which regulator you use. If it is the all in one Milwaukee regulator you will damage the low pressure gage if you open the fire extinguisher valve with the regulator set to give the output pressure you want. Some better quality regulators won't have that problem, but might have another problem. If the regulator is set to give 20 psi output pressure, and the needle valve is set to give 2 bubbles per second at that output pressure, then when you open the fire extinguisher valve you don't get a big flow surge, so there should be no problem with liquid CO2 surging out. (But, as I said, with a Milwaukee regulator you will destroy the low pressure gage.)