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  1. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
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Finally setting up some nice sized planted tanks and aquariums for myself!

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by Tom Barr, Jul 12, 2007.

  1. Phantastron

    Phantastron Junior Poster

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    Terminological Clarification

    In Tom Barr's second reply above, where he responds to the issue of CO2 loss in a wet/dry filter, he uses the expression "over height level in the box". I take this to be referring to the level of the water in the overflow box of an aquarium where the drain is internally drilled. And the goal here is to minimize the distance between the bottom of the teeth of the overflow and the level of water in the overflow thus ensuring minimal surface disruption as the water flows from the main body of the aquarium into the overflow. Is this a correct clarification of the term?
    Also is it the case that the height of the water in the overflow is solely a function of how the drain standpipe is set up. So for a given Durso standpipe, for example, this height would be set by the size of the air release hole in the top of the standpipe. Is this correct?

    Clearly this addition to the string of emails is somewhat late and, perhaps, overly pedantic. But I am a new member to this excellent site and discovering all sorts of interesting discussions. I just hope this message gets noticed.

    Regards,
     
  2. Gerryd

    Gerryd Plant Guru Team
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    Hi,

    I can't say for sure what Tom meant, but both of your statements are true.

    The less distance the water 'falls' the less noise and the less c02 lost.

    The intake standpipe has EVERYTHING to do with how much water is in the box in most configurations I have seen........

    My setup is just a pipe and a strainer/sponge. So the HIGHER the pipe in the box, the MORE water in the box, and visa versa. I just extended/reduced the pipe to get my sweet spot.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Phantastron

    Phantastron Junior Poster

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    Thanks Gerry your response is most helpful -- John
     
  4. tkos

    tkos Junior Poster

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    You say you will run the change water through a carbon system first to get rid of chlorine. How much carbon does that take and how often do you need to change that out? Or will you have to try and see first?
     
  5. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    A whole house carbon water filter will remove the chlorine, but how well it works depends on how slow the water flows through it. I use one for a continuous water change system, running about 5 gallons a day, about 2 drops per second or less. That system has been in use about 2 years, with one filter change. I have no idea how much chlorine or chloramine is in my water to start with, so how effective the filter is I don't know, other than that I don't have any problems.
     
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